Organisational change readiness: The role of negotiated order in two rural GP clinics

Melanie Bryant

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

1 Citation (Scopus)
23 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper uses theory of negotiated order to explore organisational change readiness in two rural general practice clinics involved in teaching medical students (learners). Successful change programs are often attributed to individual, group or organisational readiness, often associating it with cognitive decisions to accept or reject change. Negotiated order takes a different approach by focusing on whether and the degree to which social order, such as accepted routines, roles and patterns of interaction, are ingrained or negotiated into daily organisational practice. I argue that GP clinics that continuously negotiate learners into daily tasks and reinterpret organisational rules are more likely to be change ready in comparison to those that manage learners on top of rigidly adhered to routines.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication27th ANZAM
Subtitle of host publicationManaging on the edge
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherANZAM
Pages1-17
Number of pages17
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event27th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference: ANZAM 2013 - Hotel Grand Chancellor, Hobart, Australia
Duration: 04 Dec 201306 Dec 2013

Conference

Conference27th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference
Abbreviated titleManaging on the Edge
CountryAustralia
CityHobart
Period04/12/1306/12/13

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  • Cite this

    Bryant, M. (2013). Organisational change readiness: The role of negotiated order in two rural GP clinics. In 27th ANZAM: Managing on the edge (pp. 1-17). ANZAM.