Parasites found in the Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) in South East Queensland.

Stacey Gelis, Shane Raidal, D Spratt

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

The following is a case report describing the parasites found in wild tawny frogmouths (Podargus strigoides) from south-east Queensland as presented to the Australian Wildlife Hospital in Beerwah, Queensland. Tawny frogmouths belong to the Order Caprimulgiformes, Family Podargidae . They are often mistakenly called owls but are actually more closely related to nightjars. They are found throughout mainland Australia and Tasmania, often close to major cities where suitable woodland habitat persists. They are nocturnal, using their wide mouths, large eyes and silent flight to capture insects and small vertebrates. By day, their cryptic colouration and static perching posture allow them to melt into their background. This report describes an epizootic outbreak of neurologic disease in tawny frogmouths originating from southeast Queensland during May 2009.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvancing and Promoting Avian Medicine and Stewardship
EditorsGarry Cross
Place of PublicationAdelaide
PublisherAAVAC
Pages111-118
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2009
EventAssociation of Avian Veterinarians Australasian Committee (AAVAC) Annual Conference - Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 15 Oct 200917 Oct 2009

Conference

ConferenceAssociation of Avian Veterinarians Australasian Committee (AAVAC) Annual Conference
CountryAustralia
Period15/10/0917/10/09

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    Gelis, S., Raidal, S., & Spratt, D. (2009). Parasites found in the Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) in South East Queensland. In G. Cross (Ed.), Advancing and Promoting Avian Medicine and Stewardship (pp. 111-118). AAVAC. http://www.aavac.com.au/files/2009-16.pdf