Perspectives on geometry and measurement in the Australian curriculum: Mathematics

Thomas Lowrie, Tracy Logan, Brooke Scriven

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

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Abstract

The Australian Curriculum: Mathematics presents the measurement and geometry content strands together in order to emphasise their relationship to each other and highlight their practical relevance. In this chapter, we examine the connectivity between the measurement and geometry sub-strands and the interconnectivity with other content strands in the document. We analyse the terminology and language used throughout this content strand; evaluate the framing and structure of the strand, noting the lack of reference to visual and spatial reasoning; and question whether current assessment practices are congruent with the measurement and geometry strand. One of the most positive aspects of this strand was the potential for teachers to develop rich, conceptually-connected learning opportunities. A major area of concern was the lack of reference to visual and spatial reasoning within the content strand. Seen as a critical and integrated aspect of both sub-strands, the lack of attention afforded to such reasoning processes may impact on the way teachers enact the Curriculum. We suggest a significant and sustained professional development rogram to accompany the implementation of the Curriculum to ensure the connectivity between content strands is made explicit.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEngaging the Australian curriculum
Subtitle of host publicationMathematcis - perspectives from the field
EditorsBill Atweh, Merrilyn Goos, Robyn Jorgensen, Dianne Siemon
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherMERGA
Chapter4
Pages71-88
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781920846268
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Grant Number

  • DP120101495

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