Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Oral Pergolide Mesylate In Horses With Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction

D.I. Rendle, Gregory Doran, J.L. Ireland, Scott Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

Reasons for performing study: The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pergolide in horses are poorly understood.
Objectives: Investigate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of orally administered pergolide in horses with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID).
Study design: Cohort study.
Methods: Six horses with PPID received 4 μg/kg oral pergolide for 18 days. Samples were collected 0.5 h before and 2 and 12 h after administration of pergolide daily for 18 days and plasma pergolide and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentrations were determined.
Results: Maximum plasma concentrations after the first oral dose of pergolide (0.104–0.684 ng/mL; mean 0.308 ± 0.201 ng/mL) were not significantly different to the maximum steady state concentration at Day 18 (0.197–0.628 ng/mL; mean 0.336 ± 0.159 ng/mL). A marked difference between mean plasma peak and trough concentrations of pergolide remained throughout the study. Pergolide concentration reached steady state within 3 days and the drug did not accumulate (R = 1.09). Plasma ACTH concentration reduced significantly within 12 h of the first dose of pergolide with further reductions occurring over the next 10 days. Although there were parallel fluctuations in the concentrations of pergolide and ACTH, timing of ACTH measurement in relation to the administration of pergolide did not have a significant effect.
Conclusions: Oral pergolide rapidly suppresses the pars intermedia in horses with PPID. Follow‐up testing may be possible earlier than is employed currently. More frequent dosing may reduce fluctuation in pergolide and ACTH concentrations, which might have implications for patient monitoring.
Original languageEnglish
Article number46
Pages (from-to)25-25
Number of pages1
JournalEquine Veterinary Journal
Volume49
Issue numberS51
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Aug 2017
EventBritish Equine Veterinary Association Congress: BEVA 2017 - Liverpool, United Kingdom
Duration: 13 Sep 201716 Sep 2017
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/20423306/49/S51 (Conference abstracts)

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Pergolide
Intermediate Pituitary Gland
corticotropin
pharmacology
pharmacokinetics
Horses
mouth
Pharmacokinetics
horses
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
dosage
cohort studies
experimental design
drugs
monitoring
Physiologic Monitoring
testing

Cite this

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title = "Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Oral Pergolide Mesylate In Horses With Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction",
abstract = "Reasons for performing study: The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pergolide in horses are poorly understood. Objectives: Investigate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of orally administered pergolide in horses with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID). Study design: Cohort study. Methods: Six horses with PPID received 4 μg/kg oral pergolide for 18 days. Samples were collected 0.5 h before and 2 and 12 h after administration of pergolide daily for 18 days and plasma pergolide and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentrations were determined. Results: Maximum plasma concentrations after the first oral dose of pergolide (0.104–0.684 ng/mL; mean 0.308 ± 0.201 ng/mL) were not significantly different to the maximum steady state concentration at Day 18 (0.197–0.628 ng/mL; mean 0.336 ± 0.159 ng/mL). A marked difference between mean plasma peak and trough concentrations of pergolide remained throughout the study. Pergolide concentration reached steady state within 3 days and the drug did not accumulate (R = 1.09). Plasma ACTH concentration reduced significantly within 12 h of the first dose of pergolide with further reductions occurring over the next 10 days. Although there were parallel fluctuations in the concentrations of pergolide and ACTH, timing of ACTH measurement in relation to the administration of pergolide did not have a significant effect. Conclusions: Oral pergolide rapidly suppresses the pars intermedia in horses with PPID. Follow‐up testing may be possible earlier than is employed currently. More frequent dosing may reduce fluctuation in pergolide and ACTH concentrations, which might have implications for patient monitoring.",
author = "D.I. Rendle and Gregory Doran and J.L. Ireland and Scott Edwards",
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language = "English",
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}

Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Oral Pergolide Mesylate In Horses With Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction. / Rendle, D.I.; Doran, Gregory; Ireland, J.L.; Edwards, Scott.

In: Equine Veterinary Journal, Vol. 49, No. S51, 46, 31.08.2017, p. 25-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Oral Pergolide Mesylate In Horses With Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction

AU - Rendle, D.I.

AU - Doran, Gregory

AU - Ireland, J.L.

AU - Edwards, Scott

PY - 2017/8/31

Y1 - 2017/8/31

N2 - Reasons for performing study: The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pergolide in horses are poorly understood. Objectives: Investigate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of orally administered pergolide in horses with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID). Study design: Cohort study. Methods: Six horses with PPID received 4 μg/kg oral pergolide for 18 days. Samples were collected 0.5 h before and 2 and 12 h after administration of pergolide daily for 18 days and plasma pergolide and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentrations were determined. Results: Maximum plasma concentrations after the first oral dose of pergolide (0.104–0.684 ng/mL; mean 0.308 ± 0.201 ng/mL) were not significantly different to the maximum steady state concentration at Day 18 (0.197–0.628 ng/mL; mean 0.336 ± 0.159 ng/mL). A marked difference between mean plasma peak and trough concentrations of pergolide remained throughout the study. Pergolide concentration reached steady state within 3 days and the drug did not accumulate (R = 1.09). Plasma ACTH concentration reduced significantly within 12 h of the first dose of pergolide with further reductions occurring over the next 10 days. Although there were parallel fluctuations in the concentrations of pergolide and ACTH, timing of ACTH measurement in relation to the administration of pergolide did not have a significant effect. Conclusions: Oral pergolide rapidly suppresses the pars intermedia in horses with PPID. Follow‐up testing may be possible earlier than is employed currently. More frequent dosing may reduce fluctuation in pergolide and ACTH concentrations, which might have implications for patient monitoring.

AB - Reasons for performing study: The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pergolide in horses are poorly understood. Objectives: Investigate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of orally administered pergolide in horses with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID). Study design: Cohort study. Methods: Six horses with PPID received 4 μg/kg oral pergolide for 18 days. Samples were collected 0.5 h before and 2 and 12 h after administration of pergolide daily for 18 days and plasma pergolide and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentrations were determined. Results: Maximum plasma concentrations after the first oral dose of pergolide (0.104–0.684 ng/mL; mean 0.308 ± 0.201 ng/mL) were not significantly different to the maximum steady state concentration at Day 18 (0.197–0.628 ng/mL; mean 0.336 ± 0.159 ng/mL). A marked difference between mean plasma peak and trough concentrations of pergolide remained throughout the study. Pergolide concentration reached steady state within 3 days and the drug did not accumulate (R = 1.09). Plasma ACTH concentration reduced significantly within 12 h of the first dose of pergolide with further reductions occurring over the next 10 days. Although there were parallel fluctuations in the concentrations of pergolide and ACTH, timing of ACTH measurement in relation to the administration of pergolide did not have a significant effect. Conclusions: Oral pergolide rapidly suppresses the pars intermedia in horses with PPID. Follow‐up testing may be possible earlier than is employed currently. More frequent dosing may reduce fluctuation in pergolide and ACTH concentrations, which might have implications for patient monitoring.

UR - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/evj.12732

UR - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/evj.12731

U2 - 10.1111/evj.46_12732

DO - 10.1111/evj.46_12732

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 49

SP - 25

EP - 25

JO - Equine veterinary journal. Supplement

JF - Equine veterinary journal. Supplement

SN - 0425-1644

IS - S51

M1 - 46

ER -