Precision viticulture - an Australian perspective

David Lamb, R.G.V. Bramley, Andrew Hall

    Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paperpeer-review

    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The accessibility and low cost of global positioning systems (GPS) means that grape-growers can accurately locate themselves within their vineyard when sampling for vine growth, development and productivity. These data, when incorporated into maps, give new interpretative power to measurements that may otherwise have been used to generate simple vineyard or regional averages. Maps of yield and various quality parameters identify potential zones for segmenting harvest, areas requiring fertilization or differential irrigation management. Soil maps can be used to locate different varieties when planning a new vineyard site or aid in irrigation design. Measurement and mapping of these parameters is not confined to traditional on ground sampling methodologies either. Emerging technologies involving on-ground, airborne or spaceborne remote sensing are attracting interest because of their potential for rapidly generating data of appropriate spatial resolution. For example, on-ground electromagnetic survey techniques may provide an insight into soil texture variations and is a valuable tool in vineyard planning. Airborne or spaceborne digital imaging systems can delineate different levels of vine canopy vigor in an entire vineyard, providing up-to-date information on canopy development, and may aid in identifying the incidence of pests or diseases and in forecasting yield or fruit quality. This paper will describe the current status of precision viticulture research in Australia. Examples of emerging technologies will be used to illustrate current benefits, as well as future opportunities for improved management at not only the vineyard but at an industry-wide scale. The accessibility and low cost of global positioning systems (GPS) means that grape-growers can accurately locate themselves within their vineyard when sampling for vine growth, development and productivity. These data, when incorporated into maps, give new interpretative power to measurements that may otherwise have been used to generate simple vineyard or regional averages. Maps of yield and various quality parameters identify potential zones for segmenting harvest, areas requiring fertilization or differential irrigation management. Soil maps can be used to locate different varieties when planning a new vineyard site or aid in irrigation design. Measurement and mapping of these parameters is not confined to traditional on ground sampling methodologies either. Emerging technologies involving on-ground, airborne or spaceborne remote sensing are attracting interest because of their potential for rapidly generating data of appropriate spatial resolution. For example, on-ground electromagnetic survey techniques may provide an insight into soil texture variations and is a valuable tool in vineyard planning. Airborne or spaceborne digital imaging systems can delineate different levels of vine canopy vigor in an entire vineyard, providing up-to-date information on canopy development, and may aid in identifying the incidence of pests or diseases and in forecasting yield or fruit quality. This paper will describe the current status of precision viticulture research in Australia. Examples of emerging technologies will be used to illustrate current benefits, as well as future opportunities for improved management at not only the vineyard but at an industry-wide scale.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication ISHS Acta Horticulturae
    Subtitle of host publicationXXVI International Horticultural Congress: Viticulture - Living with Limitations
    EditorsA.G. Reynolds, P. Bowen
    Pages15-25
    Number of pages11
    Volume640
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 11 Aug 2002

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