Predicting job seeking frequency and psychological well-being in the unemployed

Karl Kilian Wiener, Tian P.S. Oei, Peter A. Creed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Unemployed (n = 118) and employed (n = 120) people were contrasted on variables of well-being, confidence, and employment commitment. The unemployed scored lower on the General Health Questionnaire (Goldberg, 1972) and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (Sherer et al., 1982). No differences were identified on levels of employment commitment. For the unemployed sample, predictors of job-seeking behavior and well-being were then examined. Intention to seek work predicted job-seeking behavior, while self-efficacy, employment commitment, and intentions to seek work predicted well-being. Results are discussed in light of current theories of job seeking behavior, and recommendations are made for practice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-81
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Employment Counseling
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1999

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Self Efficacy
Psychology
Health
Well-being
Psychological well-being
Self-efficacy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Predictors
Questionnaire
Confidence

Cite this

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abstract = "Unemployed (n = 118) and employed (n = 120) people were contrasted on variables of well-being, confidence, and employment commitment. The unemployed scored lower on the General Health Questionnaire (Goldberg, 1972) and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (Sherer et al., 1982). No differences were identified on levels of employment commitment. For the unemployed sample, predictors of job-seeking behavior and well-being were then examined. Intention to seek work predicted job-seeking behavior, while self-efficacy, employment commitment, and intentions to seek work predicted well-being. Results are discussed in light of current theories of job seeking behavior, and recommendations are made for practice.",
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Predicting job seeking frequency and psychological well-being in the unemployed. / Wiener, Karl Kilian; Oei, Tian P.S.; Creed, Peter A.

In: Journal of Employment Counseling, Vol. 36, No. 2, 06.1999, p. 67-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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