Prediction of lethality in suicide attempts: gender matters

Carol C. Choo, Keith M. Harris, Roger C. Ho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This study explores gender differences in lethality of suicide attempts. Three years of medical records related to suicide attempters ( N = 666) were subjected to analysis. Of the sample, 69.2% were female, 30.8% male; 63.8% Chinese, 15.8% Indian, and 15.0 % Malay. Ages ranged from 10 to 85 years old ( M = 29.7, SD = 16.1). More males than females made attempts with high perceived lethality (χ 2 = 12.10, p <.0001) and high medical lethality (χ 2 = 10.59, p <.0001). Available variables were subjected to regression analyses. The regression models predicted more than 60% of high medical lethality suicide attempts and more than 80% of high perceived lethality attempts. Suicide intent and opportunity for rescue were significant predictors for both measures of lethality. Gender differences were examined. Findings were discussed in regard to implications in suicide assessments and interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-103
Number of pages17
JournalOmega: Journal of Death and Dying
Volume80
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

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suicide attempt
Suicide
suicide
gender-specific factors
gender
regression
Medical Records
Regression Analysis

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title = "Prediction of lethality in suicide attempts: gender matters",
abstract = "This study explores gender differences in lethality of suicide attempts. Three years of medical records related to suicide attempters ( N = 666) were subjected to analysis. Of the sample, 69.2{\%} were female, 30.8{\%} male; 63.8{\%} Chinese, 15.8{\%} Indian, and 15.0 {\%} Malay. Ages ranged from 10 to 85 years old ( M = 29.7, SD = 16.1). More males than females made attempts with high perceived lethality (χ 2 = 12.10, p <.0001) and high medical lethality (χ 2 = 10.59, p <.0001). Available variables were subjected to regression analyses. The regression models predicted more than 60{\%} of high medical lethality suicide attempts and more than 80{\%} of high perceived lethality attempts. Suicide intent and opportunity for rescue were significant predictors for both measures of lethality. Gender differences were examined. Findings were discussed in regard to implications in suicide assessments and interventions.",
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Prediction of lethality in suicide attempts : gender matters. / Choo, Carol C.; Harris, Keith M.; Ho, Roger C.

In: Omega: Journal of Death and Dying, Vol. 80, No. 1, 11.2019, p. 87-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prediction of lethality in suicide attempts

T2 - gender matters

AU - Choo, Carol C.

AU - Harris, Keith M.

AU - Ho, Roger C.

PY - 2019/11

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N2 - This study explores gender differences in lethality of suicide attempts. Three years of medical records related to suicide attempters ( N = 666) were subjected to analysis. Of the sample, 69.2% were female, 30.8% male; 63.8% Chinese, 15.8% Indian, and 15.0 % Malay. Ages ranged from 10 to 85 years old ( M = 29.7, SD = 16.1). More males than females made attempts with high perceived lethality (χ 2 = 12.10, p <.0001) and high medical lethality (χ 2 = 10.59, p <.0001). Available variables were subjected to regression analyses. The regression models predicted more than 60% of high medical lethality suicide attempts and more than 80% of high perceived lethality attempts. Suicide intent and opportunity for rescue were significant predictors for both measures of lethality. Gender differences were examined. Findings were discussed in regard to implications in suicide assessments and interventions.

AB - This study explores gender differences in lethality of suicide attempts. Three years of medical records related to suicide attempters ( N = 666) were subjected to analysis. Of the sample, 69.2% were female, 30.8% male; 63.8% Chinese, 15.8% Indian, and 15.0 % Malay. Ages ranged from 10 to 85 years old ( M = 29.7, SD = 16.1). More males than females made attempts with high perceived lethality (χ 2 = 12.10, p <.0001) and high medical lethality (χ 2 = 10.59, p <.0001). Available variables were subjected to regression analyses. The regression models predicted more than 60% of high medical lethality suicide attempts and more than 80% of high perceived lethality attempts. Suicide intent and opportunity for rescue were significant predictors for both measures of lethality. Gender differences were examined. Findings were discussed in regard to implications in suicide assessments and interventions.

KW - lethality

KW - gender

KW - suicide attempts

KW - rescue

KW - suicide intent

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