Pregnancy-associated plasma protein predicts outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with non'ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome

W.-Y. Mei, Z.-M. Du, Q. Zhao, C.-H. Hu, Y Li, C.-F Luo, G.-F Wu, G.-W Chen, Lexin Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) may play an important role in the development of acute coronary syndrome. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the levels of circulating PAPP-A and the mid-term outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome.METHODS: The circulating PAPP-A levels and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein before PCI were measured in 129 patients with single coronary artery stenosis. The end point of clinical follow-up was cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization, and rehospitalization for angina.RESULTS: During the follow-up of an average of 20.3 ± 5.2 months, a cardiac event was recorded in 25 patients (19.4%). The levels of PAPP-A (29.85 ± 19.51 mIu/L vs 20.47 ± 14.33 mIu/L, P = .007) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (5.63 ± 2.13 mg/L vs 4.11 ± 1.28 mg/L, P = .014) in patients with cardiac events were higher than in those without cardiac events. PAPP-A ' 11.33 mIu/L has a strong predictive value for a combined end point (risk ratio = 4.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-16.2; P = .037). Patients with lower PAPP-A levels (<11.33 mIu/L) had higher event-free survivals than patients with higher PAPP-A levels (log rank = 9.334, P = .025).CONCLUSION: Circulating PAPP-A levels predict the mid-term outcomes of PCI in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome and single-vessel stenosis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e78-e83
Number of pages6
JournalHeart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pregnancy-associated plasma protein predicts outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with non'ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this