Privileging work not sex: Flexibility and employment in the sexual services industry

Jane Maree Maher, Sharon Pickering, Alison Gerard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The paper presents findings from a study of sex workers recruited in indoor licensed premises in Victoria. While the study addressed regulation, enforcement and working conditions, we focus on the value of flexible well-paid work for two particular groups of female workers (parents and students). We link this issue of flexibility to broader gendered employment conditions in Australia arguing the lack of comparable employment is crucial to understanding worker decisions about sex work. Debates and regulation focus on gendered inequalities related to heterosexuality but don't always address gendered inequalities in labour market conditions. The focus on criminalization, harm, exploitation and stigma obscures the centrality of work flexibility and conditions to women's decision-making.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)654-675
Number of pages22
JournalSociological Review
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

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flexibility
industry
employment conditions
worker
regulation
female worker
heterosexuality
criminalization
working conditions
exploitation
parents
labor market
decision making
lack
Values
Group
student

Cite this

Maher, Jane Maree ; Pickering, Sharon ; Gerard, Alison. / Privileging work not sex : Flexibility and employment in the sexual services industry. In: Sociological Review. 2012 ; Vol. 60, No. 4. pp. 654-675.
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Privileging work not sex : Flexibility and employment in the sexual services industry. / Maher, Jane Maree; Pickering, Sharon; Gerard, Alison.

In: Sociological Review, Vol. 60, No. 4, 11.2012, p. 654-675.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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