Psychological Change in Voluntary and Legally Coerced Clients of a Residential Drug and Alcohol Treatment Program

Christopher Symonds, Anthony Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Self-report measures were used to investigate psychological symptoms, motivation for change and empathy in male residential clients of an alcohol and drug treatment program. Thirty-eight participants entered treatment voluntarily and 42 participants were under various forms of legal coercion to enter treatment. Data were collected for all participants 10-15 days into treatment and again, for those remaining in treatment, at approximately 5 weeks and 10 weeks after admission. Overall, the results showed little that differentiated the psychological profile of these cohorts early in treatment or subsequently over ensuing weeks. Both types of residents, at the group and at an individual level, reported substantial improvements in their psychological state with time. Younger clients who had lived in one place for six months prior to program entry were more likely to leave treatment in the first 5 weeks. Legally coerced clients were more likely than voluntary clients to drop-out of treatment between 5 and 10 weeks.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)458-472
Number of pages15
JournalPsychiatry, Psychology and Law
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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