Psychological predictors of the propensity to omit short-response items on a high-stakes achievement test

Gabrielle Matters, Paul Burnett

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    19 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article presents the findings of a study of the psychological variables that discriminate between high and low omitters on a high-stakes achievement test using a short-response format. Data were obtained from a questionnaire administered to a random sample (N = 1,908) of students prior to sitting the 1997 Queensland Core Skills (QCS) Test (N = 29,273). Fourteen psychological variables were measured including test anxiety (four subscales), emotional stability, achievement motivation, self-esteem, academic self-concept, self-estimate of ability, locus of control (three subscales), and approaches to learning (two subscales). The results were analyzed using descriptive discriminant analysis and suggested that the psychological predictors of the propensity to omit short-response items include test-irrelevant thinking and academic self-concept, with sex of candidate being a mediating variable.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)239-256
    Number of pages18
    JournalEducational and Psychological Measurement
    Volume63
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

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