Psychology, belief and the meaning of angels

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter

Abstract

Most psychologists accept that ways of thinking affect well-being. The idea that beliefs are important to human functioning is not new, nor an idea restricted to the discipline of psychology. What the term 'belief' actually means in the psychological context is often constrained by the choice of researchers' and therapists' theoretical or philosophical stance. There are certain popular beliefs that are widely held, yet knowledge of these popular beliefs seldom informs approaches to understanding and optimising human function in scholarly psychological literature. A study of such beliefs is necessary to provide a better, fuller understanding of how human beliefs and actions help people cope in the world. The contemporary popular version of a belief in angels will be used as the working example in this chapter.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationConsequentiality VII
Subtitle of host publicationMythology, Theology, Ontology
EditorsDena Hurst
Place of PublicationTallahassee, Florida
PublisherEHC Inc
Pages235-248
Number of pages14
VolumeVol. 2
Edition14
ISBN (Print)0976263017
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Psychology, belief and the meaning of angels'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Moran, C. (2006). Psychology, belief and the meaning of angels. In D. Hurst (Ed.), Consequentiality VII: Mythology, Theology, Ontology (14 ed., Vol. Vol. 2, pp. 235-248). EHC Inc.