Reading with 1–2 year olds impacts academic achievement at 8–11 years

Michelle I. Brown, Cen Wang, Sharynne McLeod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Parent-child book reading with infants is widely recommended and considered one of the most effective parent-child activities for promoting language and literacy development; however, there is limited evidence that reading books with infants (1–2 years) strengthens later literacy skills. The present study examined the long-term impact of parent-child book reading at 1–2 years with literacy, language, and numeracy skills at 8–11 years. Participants were 3547 infants and their caregivers from a nationally representative study. The number of minutes caregivers reported reading books with their infants (1–2 year) were examined with literacy, language, and numeracy skills on a national assessment program in Grades 3 (8–9 years) and 5 (10–11 years). Covariates included sex, age, race, language background, socioeconomic position, and cognition. Small and positive relationships were found between parent-child book reading at 1–2 years and reading, spelling, grammar, and numeracy scores in Grade 3 (8–9 years) and reading, writing, spelling, and grammar scores in Grade 5 (10–11 years). Infants (1–2 years) whose parents read with them for 11 minutes or more per day had stronger reading, spelling, and grammar skills in Grades 3 and 5.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)198-207
Number of pages10
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume58
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Reading with 1–2 year olds impacts academic achievement at 8–11 years'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this