Recommendations for the effective monitoring of cats and wildlife as part of an enhanced management program on French Island

Michael Johnston, Elizabeth Znidersic

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

The arrival of invasive predatory species, such as cats (Felis catus), onto islands causes population decline and extinction of insular wildlife species. Islands provide critical habitat for biota worldwide with fauna particularly susceptible to predation and other impacts that follow the arrival of invasive species. The introduction of domestic cats onto islands inevitably leads to self-sustaining feral populations becoming established that compounds the threats to wildlife. There is increasing global awareness of these impacts which has led to the development of tools and strategies to reverse the loss of wildlife by removing cats from islands (Nogales et al. 2004; Campbell et al. 2011; Parkes et al. 2014). The Database of Island Invasive Species Eradications reports that there has been 100 islands globally from which cats have been removed, with 20 of these in Australia (DIISE 2017). Diligent planning is critical for successful species removal programs to have the best chance of success and to minimise unintended consequences that may occur as a result of the program, such as release of other invasive species, i.e. rabbits. This necessarily requires engagement with land owners and stakeholder agencies to ensure that project objectives are realised.
Original languageEnglish
Commissioning bodyPort Phillip and Westernport Catchment Management Authority
Number of pages41
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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