Refugees rejuvenating and connecting communities: An analysis of the social, cultural and economic contributions of Hazara humanitarian migrants in the Port Adelaide-Enfield area of Adelaide, South Australia (summary report)

David Radford, Branka Krivokapic-Skoko, Heidi Hetz, Hannah Soong, Rosie Roberts, George Tan

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

The MCCSA was pleased to partner with Dr David Radford and his team from the University of South Australia and Charles Sturt University, on a research study focusing on the contribution the Hazara community have made in the Port Adelaide- Enfield area of Adelaide.
The research used an ethnographic approach providing an insight into the Hazara migrants and how they interrelate with and contribute to the local community in the Port Adelaide – Enfield Local Council area of SA. The report also addresses some of the challenges migrant communities face in the settlement process, adapting to a host community whilst supporting their own to transition into the new way of life.
Refugees, rejuvenating and connecting communities report provides us with an understanding of the complexity of the migration experience, its impacts on communities and society and how one community has positively contributed to one of Adelaide’s largest and diverse local government area.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherUniversity of South Australia
Commissioning bodyMulticultural Communities Council of South Australia
Number of pages56
ISBN (Print)ISBN 978-1-922046-33-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Mar 2021
Event

OFFICIALLY LAUNCH THE RESEARCH REPORT
'REFUGEES REJUVENATING AND CONNECTING COMMUNITIES'
: Launch of the report by His Excellency the Honourable Hieu Van Le AC
- Government House , Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 29 Mar 202129 Mar 2021

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