Regional scale adaptive management

lessons from the north east salinity strategy(NESS)

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Abstract

The regional scale has become increasingly , important for natural resource management, with . funding support focused on regional plans. It is also the scale at which adaptive management - an approach to managing natural resources that actively seeks to learn from the implementation of policies and strategies - could be expected to work best. This article explores passive and active adaptive management through review of a salinity management program ill the north-east region of Victoria between J997 and 200l. The North East Salinity Strategy (NESS) was a conventional, passively adaptive program, but active adaptive management could have been considered. We sought to understand the NESS program logic through document review, semi·structured interviews and a focus group, and in the process looked for signs of adaptive management.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-84
Number of pages9
JournalAustralasian Journal of Environmental Management
Volume10
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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adaptive management
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Cite this

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title = "Regional scale adaptive management: lessons from the north east salinity strategy(NESS)",
abstract = "The regional scale has become increasingly , important for natural resource management, with . funding support focused on regional plans. It is also the scale at which adaptive management - an approach to managing natural resources that actively seeks to learn from the implementation of policies and strategies - could be expected to work best. This article explores passive and active adaptive management through review of a salinity management program ill the north-east region of Victoria between J997 and 200l. The North East Salinity Strategy (NESS) was a conventional, passively adaptive program, but active adaptive management could have been considered. We sought to understand the NESS program logic through document review, semi{\^A}·structured interviews and a focus group, and in the process looked for signs of adaptive management.",
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AU - Allan, Catherine

AU - Curtis, Allan

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Australasian Journal of Environmental Management. ISSNs: 1322-1698;

PY - 2003

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N2 - The regional scale has become increasingly , important for natural resource management, with . funding support focused on regional plans. It is also the scale at which adaptive management - an approach to managing natural resources that actively seeks to learn from the implementation of policies and strategies - could be expected to work best. This article explores passive and active adaptive management through review of a salinity management program ill the north-east region of Victoria between J997 and 200l. The North East Salinity Strategy (NESS) was a conventional, passively adaptive program, but active adaptive management could have been considered. We sought to understand the NESS program logic through document review, semi·structured interviews and a focus group, and in the process looked for signs of adaptive management.

AB - The regional scale has become increasingly , important for natural resource management, with . funding support focused on regional plans. It is also the scale at which adaptive management - an approach to managing natural resources that actively seeks to learn from the implementation of policies and strategies - could be expected to work best. This article explores passive and active adaptive management through review of a salinity management program ill the north-east region of Victoria between J997 and 200l. The North East Salinity Strategy (NESS) was a conventional, passively adaptive program, but active adaptive management could have been considered. We sought to understand the NESS program logic through document review, semi·structured interviews and a focus group, and in the process looked for signs of adaptive management.

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