Relationship Status and Suicidal Behavior in Gay Men

The Role of Thwarted Belongingness and Hope

Kym Riley, Suzanne McLaren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Levels of suicidal behavior among gay men are a significant concern. The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide proposes that being unpartnered is a risk factor for suicidal behavior due to thwarted belongingness; however, this has yet to be tested empirically. Recent studies also indicate that the two components of hope, agency and pathways, may be protective against suicidal behavior. The first aim of the current study was to investigate whether thwarted belongingness mediates the relationship between relationship status and suicidal behavior in gay men. The study also examined whether agency and pathways weaken the association between relationship status and thwarted belongingness, and whether agency weakens the relation between thwarted belongingness and suicidal behavior. Method: A sample of 370 self-identified gay men aged from 18 to 66 years old (M = 26.13, SD = 8.02) completed the Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire—Revised, the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire—Revised, and the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale. Results: Results showed that thwarted belongingness mediated the relationship between relationship status and suicidal behavior. The hypothesized moderated-mediation models were not supported. Conclusions: These findings have implications for the development of interventions that aim to reduce suicidal behaviors in gay men.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Nov 2018

Fingerprint

Hope
Sexual Minorities
Suicide

Cite this

@article{55f52332dfb74b37b2d94fe174584190,
title = "Relationship Status and Suicidal Behavior in Gay Men: The Role of Thwarted Belongingness and Hope",
abstract = "Levels of suicidal behavior among gay men are a significant concern. The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide proposes that being unpartnered is a risk factor for suicidal behavior due to thwarted belongingness; however, this has yet to be tested empirically. Recent studies also indicate that the two components of hope, agency and pathways, may be protective against suicidal behavior. The first aim of the current study was to investigate whether thwarted belongingness mediates the relationship between relationship status and suicidal behavior in gay men. The study also examined whether agency and pathways weaken the association between relationship status and thwarted belongingness, and whether agency weakens the relation between thwarted belongingness and suicidal behavior. Method: A sample of 370 self-identified gay men aged from 18 to 66 years old (M = 26.13, SD = 8.02) completed the Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire—Revised, the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire—Revised, and the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale. Results: Results showed that thwarted belongingness mediated the relationship between relationship status and suicidal behavior. The hypothesized moderated-mediation models were not supported. Conclusions: These findings have implications for the development of interventions that aim to reduce suicidal behaviors in gay men.",
author = "Kym Riley and Suzanne McLaren",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1111/sltb.12532",
language = "English",
journal = "Suicide",
issn = "0363-0234",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship Status and Suicidal Behavior in Gay Men

T2 - The Role of Thwarted Belongingness and Hope

AU - Riley, Kym

AU - McLaren, Suzanne

PY - 2018/11/18

Y1 - 2018/11/18

N2 - Levels of suicidal behavior among gay men are a significant concern. The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide proposes that being unpartnered is a risk factor for suicidal behavior due to thwarted belongingness; however, this has yet to be tested empirically. Recent studies also indicate that the two components of hope, agency and pathways, may be protective against suicidal behavior. The first aim of the current study was to investigate whether thwarted belongingness mediates the relationship between relationship status and suicidal behavior in gay men. The study also examined whether agency and pathways weaken the association between relationship status and thwarted belongingness, and whether agency weakens the relation between thwarted belongingness and suicidal behavior. Method: A sample of 370 self-identified gay men aged from 18 to 66 years old (M = 26.13, SD = 8.02) completed the Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire—Revised, the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire—Revised, and the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale. Results: Results showed that thwarted belongingness mediated the relationship between relationship status and suicidal behavior. The hypothesized moderated-mediation models were not supported. Conclusions: These findings have implications for the development of interventions that aim to reduce suicidal behaviors in gay men.

AB - Levels of suicidal behavior among gay men are a significant concern. The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide proposes that being unpartnered is a risk factor for suicidal behavior due to thwarted belongingness; however, this has yet to be tested empirically. Recent studies also indicate that the two components of hope, agency and pathways, may be protective against suicidal behavior. The first aim of the current study was to investigate whether thwarted belongingness mediates the relationship between relationship status and suicidal behavior in gay men. The study also examined whether agency and pathways weaken the association between relationship status and thwarted belongingness, and whether agency weakens the relation between thwarted belongingness and suicidal behavior. Method: A sample of 370 self-identified gay men aged from 18 to 66 years old (M = 26.13, SD = 8.02) completed the Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire—Revised, the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire—Revised, and the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale. Results: Results showed that thwarted belongingness mediated the relationship between relationship status and suicidal behavior. The hypothesized moderated-mediation models were not supported. Conclusions: These findings have implications for the development of interventions that aim to reduce suicidal behaviors in gay men.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056730730&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85056730730&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/sltb.12532

DO - 10.1111/sltb.12532

M3 - Article

JO - Suicide

JF - Suicide

SN - 0363-0234

ER -