Reply to Schandl et al., 2016, JCLEPRO and Hatfield-Dodds et al., 2015, Nature: How challenging is decoupling for Australia?

Manfred Lenzen, Arunima Malik, Daniel Foran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this letter, we respond to the articles 'Decoupling global environmental pressure and economic growth: scenarios for energy use, materials use and carbon emissions' by Heinz Schandl et al. (Journal of Cleaner Production, 132, 45e56) and 'Australia is 'free to choose' economic growth and falling environmental pressures' by Hatfield-Dodds et al. (Nature, 527, 49e53). The authors of these papers suggestthat policy settings are crucial for Australia to allow growing standard of living to coincide with lower environmental pressure and impact. Both papers make it clear that decoupling has not occurred in past, but stress that this does not mean it cannot occur in the future. Here, we undertake a comprehensive trend analysis by putting their decoupling scenarios into a historical context to assess the feasibility of decoupling economic growth from environmental impacts. To this end, we undertake a structural decomposition analysis to examine the drivers of a change in Australia's greenhouse gas emissions from 1976 to 2050. Using the well-known I¼PAT equation, we appraise the contribution of population growth, affluence and technology in accelerating or decelerating the growth of emissions over the 75 year period.Our results suggest that population growth and affluence are key accelerators of greenhouse gas emissions.We argue that in order to decrease emissions from fuel consumption, unprecedented improvements in emissions intensity will be required both in Australia and globally.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)796-798
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Cleaner Production
Volume139
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

economic growth
population growth
Gas emissions
Greenhouse gases
greenhouse gas
Economics
cleaner production
decomposition analysis
trend analysis
fuel consumption
living standard
carbon emission
energy use
Fuel consumption
environmental impact
Particle accelerators
Environmental impact
Nature
Decoupling
Decomposition

Cite this

@article{8b9f0c146fc04c9688a9f553b47d1d97,
title = "Reply to Schandl et al., 2016, JCLEPRO and Hatfield-Dodds et al., 2015, Nature: How challenging is decoupling for Australia?",
abstract = "In this letter, we respond to the articles 'Decoupling global environmental pressure and economic growth: scenarios for energy use, materials use and carbon emissions' by Heinz Schandl et al. (Journal of Cleaner Production, 132, 45e56) and 'Australia is 'free to choose' economic growth and falling environmental pressures' by Hatfield-Dodds et al. (Nature, 527, 49e53). The authors of these papers suggestthat policy settings are crucial for Australia to allow growing standard of living to coincide with lower environmental pressure and impact. Both papers make it clear that decoupling has not occurred in past, but stress that this does not mean it cannot occur in the future. Here, we undertake a comprehensive trend analysis by putting their decoupling scenarios into a historical context to assess the feasibility of decoupling economic growth from environmental impacts. To this end, we undertake a structural decomposition analysis to examine the drivers of a change in Australia's greenhouse gas emissions from 1976 to 2050. Using the well-known I{\^A}¼PAT equation, we appraise the contribution of population growth, affluence and technology in accelerating or decelerating the growth of emissions over the 75 year period.Our results suggest that population growth and affluence are key accelerators of greenhouse gas emissions.We argue that in order to decrease emissions from fuel consumption, unprecedented improvements in emissions intensity will be required both in Australia and globally.",
author = "Manfred Lenzen and Arunima Malik and Daniel Foran",
note = "Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Journal of Cleaner Production. ISSNs: 0959-6526;",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.08.037",
language = "English",
volume = "139",
pages = "796--798",
journal = "Journal of Cleaner Production",
issn = "0959-6526",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Reply to Schandl et al., 2016, JCLEPRO and Hatfield-Dodds et al., 2015, Nature : How challenging is decoupling for Australia? / Lenzen, Manfred; Malik, Arunima; Foran, Daniel.

In: Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol. 139, 2016, p. 796-798.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reply to Schandl et al., 2016, JCLEPRO and Hatfield-Dodds et al., 2015, Nature

T2 - How challenging is decoupling for Australia?

AU - Lenzen, Manfred

AU - Malik, Arunima

AU - Foran, Daniel

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Journal of Cleaner Production. ISSNs: 0959-6526;

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - In this letter, we respond to the articles 'Decoupling global environmental pressure and economic growth: scenarios for energy use, materials use and carbon emissions' by Heinz Schandl et al. (Journal of Cleaner Production, 132, 45e56) and 'Australia is 'free to choose' economic growth and falling environmental pressures' by Hatfield-Dodds et al. (Nature, 527, 49e53). The authors of these papers suggestthat policy settings are crucial for Australia to allow growing standard of living to coincide with lower environmental pressure and impact. Both papers make it clear that decoupling has not occurred in past, but stress that this does not mean it cannot occur in the future. Here, we undertake a comprehensive trend analysis by putting their decoupling scenarios into a historical context to assess the feasibility of decoupling economic growth from environmental impacts. To this end, we undertake a structural decomposition analysis to examine the drivers of a change in Australia's greenhouse gas emissions from 1976 to 2050. Using the well-known I¼PAT equation, we appraise the contribution of population growth, affluence and technology in accelerating or decelerating the growth of emissions over the 75 year period.Our results suggest that population growth and affluence are key accelerators of greenhouse gas emissions.We argue that in order to decrease emissions from fuel consumption, unprecedented improvements in emissions intensity will be required both in Australia and globally.

AB - In this letter, we respond to the articles 'Decoupling global environmental pressure and economic growth: scenarios for energy use, materials use and carbon emissions' by Heinz Schandl et al. (Journal of Cleaner Production, 132, 45e56) and 'Australia is 'free to choose' economic growth and falling environmental pressures' by Hatfield-Dodds et al. (Nature, 527, 49e53). The authors of these papers suggestthat policy settings are crucial for Australia to allow growing standard of living to coincide with lower environmental pressure and impact. Both papers make it clear that decoupling has not occurred in past, but stress that this does not mean it cannot occur in the future. Here, we undertake a comprehensive trend analysis by putting their decoupling scenarios into a historical context to assess the feasibility of decoupling economic growth from environmental impacts. To this end, we undertake a structural decomposition analysis to examine the drivers of a change in Australia's greenhouse gas emissions from 1976 to 2050. Using the well-known I¼PAT equation, we appraise the contribution of population growth, affluence and technology in accelerating or decelerating the growth of emissions over the 75 year period.Our results suggest that population growth and affluence are key accelerators of greenhouse gas emissions.We argue that in order to decrease emissions from fuel consumption, unprecedented improvements in emissions intensity will be required both in Australia and globally.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.08.037

DO - 10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.08.037

M3 - Article

VL - 139

SP - 796

EP - 798

JO - Journal of Cleaner Production

JF - Journal of Cleaner Production

SN - 0959-6526

ER -