Research priorities for weed suppression by crops in Australia

Michael Widderick, Deirdre Lemerle, Cameron Taylor, Chris Johansen, Abul Hashem, Vikki Osten, Tony Cook, Kerry Bell, Andrew Storrie

    Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paperpeer-review

    74 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Crop competition is an important tactic for suppressing weed growth and maintaining crop yield, especially with the increasing levels of herbicide resistance in Australia. In 2015, a team of weed sci-entists from the western, southern and northern grain production regions conducted a comprehensive review of research on crop competition in Australia, funded by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC). The aim of the study was to enable a 20% increase in grower adoption of this tactic for weed suppression by 2020. The project team: identified priority weed species; conducted a meta-analysis of pooled data to identify common trends; conducted a knowledge gap analysis based on the literature review and the meta-analysis; defined an approach for im-proved future crop competition experimentation; and identified and provided recommendations for future Research, Development and Extension (RD&E).An updated assessment of priority and key weed species was provided. The need for more studies on agronomic means of enhancing weed competition were identified, especially for weakly competitive crops such as pulses. These included crop rotation, fertiliser manipulations and determination of traits conferring competitiveness that can be used in varietal selection and breeding programs. Further, it is necessary to guide farmers on understanding the benefits of growing a competitive crop as a viable alternative to chemical weed control. Plant breeding for crop traits associated with strong competitive ability will provide an alterna-tive and longer-term solution to weed management
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication21st Australasian Weed Conference (2018)
    Subtitle of host publicationWeed biosecurity - Protecting our future
    EditorsStephen Johnson, Leslie Weston, Hanwen Wu, Bruce Auld
    PublisherWeed Society of NSW
    Pages133-136
    Number of pages4
    ISBN (Print)9780995415911
    Publication statusPublished - 2018
    Event21st Australasian Weeds Conference (2018) - Novotel Sydney Manly Pacific, Sydney, Australia
    Duration: 09 Sept 201813 Sept 2018
    http://caws.org.nz/old-site/awc_contents.php?yr=2018 (conference proceedings)
    https://abercrombie.eventsair.com/QuickEventWebsitePortal/21awc/21awc-web/Agenda (conference program)

    Conference

    Conference21st Australasian Weeds Conference (2018)
    Abbreviated titleWeed biosecurity - Protecting our future
    Country/TerritoryAustralia
    CitySydney
    Period09/09/1813/09/18
    OtherThe Weed Society of New South Wales Inc., on behalf of the Council of Australasian Weed Societies Inc., will be hosting the 21st Australasian Weeds Conference in the popular Sydney beach side suburb of Manly from 9 - 12 September 2018.  An assortment of field trips will be hosted on Thursday 13 September 2018.
    This biennial conference carries on a long tradition of bringing the weed management community together to discuss new developments and share information about cutting-edge and best weed management practices.
    The conference attracts over 250 delegates from across Australasia and globally.  Delegates will come together to network with peers, engage with industry sponsors, listen and participate in presentations and field trips on a variety of topics including; 
    - New technologies in weed management.
    - Biological, mechanical, and chemical weed control and research.
    - Herbicide resistance.
    - Weeds of crops and pastures.
    - Environmental weeds and Weeds of National Significance.
    Internet address

    Grant Number

    • DAQ00197

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Research priorities for weed suppression by crops in Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this