Resiliency among older adults

dispositional hope as a protective factor in the insomnia–depressive symptoms relation

Alexandra Trezise, Suzanne McLaren, Rapson Gomez, Bridget Bice, Jessica Hodgetts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Depression is a significant mental health issue among older Australian adults. Research has indicated that insomnia is a key risk factor for the development of depressive symptoms in older adults, and that dispositional hope may be protective against the development of depressive symptoms in this population. This study examined whether dispositional hope and its dimensions, agency and pathways, moderated the relationship between insomnia symptoms and depressive symptoms among older Australian adults. Method: A community sample of 88 men (Mage = 71.11, SDage = 5.54) and 111 women (Mage = 70.25, SDage = 4.64), aged 65–94 years, completed the Insomnia Severity Index, Adult Dispositional Hope Scale, and Centre of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Results: After controlling for gender, age, relationship status, education level, method of participation, and perceived physical health, results supported the moderation models. The insomnia–depressive symptoms relation was significant for older adults with low and average (but not high) levels of dispositional hope, agency, and pathways. The Johnson–Neyman analyses indicated that the insomnia–depressive symptoms relation was significant for older adults who scored below 27.10 on dispositional hope, below 13.73 on agency, and below 13.49 and above 15.64 on pathways. Conclusion: The results of this study imply that interventions aimed at increasing dispositional hope, agency, and pathways among older adults who experience symptoms of insomnia may reduce their depressive symptoms. A cautionary note, however, is that very high scores on pathways among older adults who experience insomnia symptoms may be detrimental to their mental health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1094-1102
Number of pages9
JournalAging and Mental Health
Volume22
Issue number8
Early online date14 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 03 Aug 2018

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Hope
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Depression
Mental Health
Protective Factors
Epidemiologic Studies
Education
Health

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Trezise, Alexandra ; McLaren, Suzanne ; Gomez, Rapson ; Bice, Bridget ; Hodgetts, Jessica. / Resiliency among older adults : dispositional hope as a protective factor in the insomnia–depressive symptoms relation. In: Aging and Mental Health. 2018 ; Vol. 22, No. 8. pp. 1094-1102.
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Resiliency among older adults : dispositional hope as a protective factor in the insomnia–depressive symptoms relation. / Trezise, Alexandra; McLaren, Suzanne; Gomez, Rapson; Bice, Bridget; Hodgetts, Jessica.

In: Aging and Mental Health, Vol. 22, No. 8, 03.08.2018, p. 1094-1102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - dispositional hope as a protective factor in the insomnia–depressive symptoms relation

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