Response to the Environment: Social Capital and Sustainability

Jenny Onyx, Lynelle Osburn, Paul Bullen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines the empirical connection between social capital and attitudes to issues of ecological sustainability within the community of Brokell Hill. More specifically, it focuses all the empirical link between the way people think and act towards other people within the community and the way they think and act towards the environment. This relationship is tested using the results from a questionnaire survey. The results indicate that attitudes to the environment form a coherent factor that is distinct from the social capital factors, but is nonetheless related to the higher order factor. Those with stronger social capital scores have more positive attitudes to the environment. The implications for environmental policy and the potential for grassroots action are examined in the concluding discussion.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-27
Number of pages8
JournalAustralasian Journal of Environmental Management
Volume11
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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social capital
sustainability
social attitude
questionnaire survey
environmental policy
community
questionnaire

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abstract = "This article examines the empirical connection between social capital and attitudes to issues of ecological sustainability within the community of Brokell Hill. More specifically, it focuses all the empirical link between the way people think and act towards other people within the community and the way they think and act towards the environment. This relationship is tested using the results from a questionnaire survey. The results indicate that attitudes to the environment form a coherent factor that is distinct from the social capital factors, but is nonetheless related to the higher order factor. Those with stronger social capital scores have more positive attitudes to the environment. The implications for environmental policy and the potential for grassroots action are examined in the concluding discussion.",
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Response to the Environment : Social Capital and Sustainability. / Onyx, Jenny; Osburn, Lynelle; Bullen, Paul.

In: Australasian Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 11, No. 3, 2004, p. 20-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Response to the Environment

T2 - Social Capital and Sustainability

AU - Onyx, Jenny

AU - Osburn, Lynelle

AU - Bullen, Paul

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PY - 2004

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N2 - This article examines the empirical connection between social capital and attitudes to issues of ecological sustainability within the community of Brokell Hill. More specifically, it focuses all the empirical link between the way people think and act towards other people within the community and the way they think and act towards the environment. This relationship is tested using the results from a questionnaire survey. The results indicate that attitudes to the environment form a coherent factor that is distinct from the social capital factors, but is nonetheless related to the higher order factor. Those with stronger social capital scores have more positive attitudes to the environment. The implications for environmental policy and the potential for grassroots action are examined in the concluding discussion.

AB - This article examines the empirical connection between social capital and attitudes to issues of ecological sustainability within the community of Brokell Hill. More specifically, it focuses all the empirical link between the way people think and act towards other people within the community and the way they think and act towards the environment. This relationship is tested using the results from a questionnaire survey. The results indicate that attitudes to the environment form a coherent factor that is distinct from the social capital factors, but is nonetheless related to the higher order factor. Those with stronger social capital scores have more positive attitudes to the environment. The implications for environmental policy and the potential for grassroots action are examined in the concluding discussion.

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