Rich transitions from Indigenous counting systems to English arithmetic strategies: Implications for mathematics education in Papua New Guinea.

Rex Matang, Kay Owens

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

Abstract

In the context of current curriculum reform being implemented in the primary and secondary education sectors of the national education system of Papua New Guinea (PNG), this paper explores the possibility of utilizing and building on the rich cultural knowledge of counting and arithmetic strategies embedded in the country's 800-plus traditional counting systems. This is based on the commonly accepted educational assumption that learning of mathematics is more effective and meaningful if it begins from the more familiar mathematical practices found in the learner's own socio-cultural environment. Based on the basic number structures and operative patterns of the respective counting systems from selected language groups, the paper briefly describe how the rich diversity amoung these language groups can be used as the basis to teach basic English arithmetic strategies in both elementary and lower primary schools in Papua New Guinea.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationICME-10
EditorsFranco Favilli
Place of PublicationPisa, Italy
PublisherTipografia Editrice Pisana
Pages1-15
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)0873535685
Publication statusPublished - 2006
EventInternational Congress on Mathematics Education (ICME) - Copenhagen, Denmark, Denmark
Duration: 04 Jul 200411 Jul 2004

Conference

ConferenceInternational Congress on Mathematics Education (ICME)
CountryDenmark
Period04/07/0411/07/04

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