"Right on Time"

on the relationships between moral concepts and temporal discounting

Justin Harrison

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Philosophical traditions place self-restraint at the centre of virtue ethics, while recent theoretical and empirical work in moral psychology suggests that self-control is 'the master virtue' (Baumeister & Exline, 1999, p. 1165). However, the connections between moral attitudes and impulsivity have rarely been addressed explicitly; this thesis investigated these relationships. Chapter 1 presented theoretical and empirical rationales for our investigations, and introduced our measures of moral attitudes and impulsivity: Moral Foundations Theory and Temporal Discounting, respectively. Chapter 3 demonstrated the test-retest stability of a temporal discounting measure used in much of the thesis.Chapters 2 and 4 investigated relationships between impulsivity and concerns for the five moral themes elucidated by Moral Foundations theory. Positive relationships between the Moral Foundations and temporal discounting rates were detected, but only where participants were required to bid on delayed monies with their own funds (Chapter Four). Moreover, correlations were mediated by education for the'Binding' moral foundations (Loyalty, Authority & Purity) but not the Individualising foundations. We submit that loss aversion played a role in these results, which is congruent with moral theories that argue for the primacy of emotional processes in moral cognition.Chapters 5, 6 and 7 investigated the effects of external cues (i.e. supraliminal primes) on impulsivity. Contrary to expectations, primes related to 'Fairness' produced within-subjects increases in temporal discounting rates (Chapter Five). However, an attempted replication of the effect, also employing Shariff and Norenzayan's (2007) religion priming task, detected no priming effects on discounting rates (Chapter 6).
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Charles Sturt University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • McKay, Ryan, Principal Supervisor
  • Luck, Morgan, Co-Supervisor
Award date25 Mar 2013
Place of PublicationAustralia
Publisher
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Impulsivity
Priming
Replication
Self-control
Moral Theory
Loyalty
Philosophical Traditions
Restraint
Primacy
Education
Authority
Purity
Moral Cognition
Moral Psychology
Fairness
Virtue Ethics
Emotion
Religion
Aversion

Cite this

Harrison, J. (2013). "Right on Time": on the relationships between moral concepts and temporal discounting. Australia: Charles Sturt University.
Harrison, Justin. / "Right on Time" : on the relationships between moral concepts and temporal discounting. Australia : Charles Sturt University, 2013. 235 p.
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abstract = "Philosophical traditions place self-restraint at the centre of virtue ethics, while recent theoretical and empirical work in moral psychology suggests that self-control is 'the master virtue' (Baumeister & Exline, 1999, p. 1165). However, the connections between moral attitudes and impulsivity have rarely been addressed explicitly; this thesis investigated these relationships. Chapter 1 presented theoretical and empirical rationales for our investigations, and introduced our measures of moral attitudes and impulsivity: Moral Foundations Theory and Temporal Discounting, respectively. Chapter 3 demonstrated the test-retest stability of a temporal discounting measure used in much of the thesis.Chapters 2 and 4 investigated relationships between impulsivity and concerns for the five moral themes elucidated by Moral Foundations theory. Positive relationships between the Moral Foundations and temporal discounting rates were detected, but only where participants were required to bid on delayed monies with their own funds (Chapter Four). Moreover, correlations were mediated by education for the'Binding' moral foundations (Loyalty, Authority & Purity) but not the Individualising foundations. We submit that loss aversion played a role in these results, which is congruent with moral theories that argue for the primacy of emotional processes in moral cognition.Chapters 5, 6 and 7 investigated the effects of external cues (i.e. supraliminal primes) on impulsivity. Contrary to expectations, primes related to 'Fairness' produced within-subjects increases in temporal discounting rates (Chapter Five). However, an attempted replication of the effect, also employing Shariff and Norenzayan's (2007) religion priming task, detected no priming effects on discounting rates (Chapter 6).",
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Harrison, J 2013, '"Right on Time": on the relationships between moral concepts and temporal discounting', Doctor of Philosophy, Charles Sturt University, Australia.

"Right on Time" : on the relationships between moral concepts and temporal discounting. / Harrison, Justin.

Australia : Charles Sturt University, 2013. 235 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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T1 - "Right on Time"

T2 - on the relationships between moral concepts and temporal discounting

AU - Harrison, Justin

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

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AB - Philosophical traditions place self-restraint at the centre of virtue ethics, while recent theoretical and empirical work in moral psychology suggests that self-control is 'the master virtue' (Baumeister & Exline, 1999, p. 1165). However, the connections between moral attitudes and impulsivity have rarely been addressed explicitly; this thesis investigated these relationships. Chapter 1 presented theoretical and empirical rationales for our investigations, and introduced our measures of moral attitudes and impulsivity: Moral Foundations Theory and Temporal Discounting, respectively. Chapter 3 demonstrated the test-retest stability of a temporal discounting measure used in much of the thesis.Chapters 2 and 4 investigated relationships between impulsivity and concerns for the five moral themes elucidated by Moral Foundations theory. Positive relationships between the Moral Foundations and temporal discounting rates were detected, but only where participants were required to bid on delayed monies with their own funds (Chapter Four). Moreover, correlations were mediated by education for the'Binding' moral foundations (Loyalty, Authority & Purity) but not the Individualising foundations. We submit that loss aversion played a role in these results, which is congruent with moral theories that argue for the primacy of emotional processes in moral cognition.Chapters 5, 6 and 7 investigated the effects of external cues (i.e. supraliminal primes) on impulsivity. Contrary to expectations, primes related to 'Fairness' produced within-subjects increases in temporal discounting rates (Chapter Five). However, an attempted replication of the effect, also employing Shariff and Norenzayan's (2007) religion priming task, detected no priming effects on discounting rates (Chapter 6).

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

PB - Charles Sturt University

CY - Australia

ER -

Harrison J. "Right on Time": on the relationships between moral concepts and temporal discounting. Australia: Charles Sturt University, 2013. 235 p.