Risk Factors for Developing Comorbid Sleeping Problems: Results of a Survey of 1,925 Women Over 50 With a Chronic Health Condition

Sophie Meredith, Jane Frawley, Jon Adams, David Sibbritt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To test the association between sleeping problems and multiple epidemiological factors among women over 50 with a chronic condition. Method: The Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-SS) was employed to measure sleep problems among 1,925 participants with chronic conditions who also responded to questions about health service use, self-care and demographics. Results: About 43% of women reported sleeping problems. Women were more likely to have a sleeping problem if they reported some difficulties with available income, odds ratio (OR) = 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): [1.27, 2.04]; p < .005, or were struggling with available income (OR = 2.84; 95% CI: [2.04, 3.96]; p < .005). Women were less likely to have sleeping problems if they were highly physically active (OR = .63; 95% CI: [0.51, 0.79]; p < .005). Discussion: Medical professionals should be aware of the significant risk of sleeping problems among mid-age and older women with chronic health conditions, particularly those who have financial concerns, are sedentary, or are not highly physically active.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

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Health
health
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
confidence
sleep
Sleep
income
Self Care
Health Services
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires
health service

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title = "Risk Factors for Developing Comorbid Sleeping Problems: Results of a Survey of 1,925 Women Over 50 With a Chronic Health Condition",
abstract = "Objective: To test the association between sleeping problems and multiple epidemiological factors among women over 50 with a chronic condition. Method: The Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-SS) was employed to measure sleep problems among 1,925 participants with chronic conditions who also responded to questions about health service use, self-care and demographics. Results: About 43{\%} of women reported sleeping problems. Women were more likely to have a sleeping problem if they reported some difficulties with available income, odds ratio (OR) = 1.61; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): [1.27, 2.04]; p < .005, or were struggling with available income (OR = 2.84; 95{\%} CI: [2.04, 3.96]; p < .005). Women were less likely to have sleeping problems if they were highly physically active (OR = .63; 95{\%} CI: [0.51, 0.79]; p < .005). Discussion: Medical professionals should be aware of the significant risk of sleeping problems among mid-age and older women with chronic health conditions, particularly those who have financial concerns, are sedentary, or are not highly physically active.",
author = "Sophie Meredith and Jane Frawley and Jon Adams and David Sibbritt",
year = "2019",
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doi = "https://doi.org/10.1177/0898264319832134",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Aging and Health",
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Risk Factors for Developing Comorbid Sleeping Problems: Results of a Survey of 1,925 Women Over 50 With a Chronic Health Condition. / Meredith, Sophie; Frawley, Jane; Adams, Jon ; Sibbritt, David.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, 02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Adams, Jon

AU - Sibbritt, David

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AB - Objective: To test the association between sleeping problems and multiple epidemiological factors among women over 50 with a chronic condition. Method: The Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-SS) was employed to measure sleep problems among 1,925 participants with chronic conditions who also responded to questions about health service use, self-care and demographics. Results: About 43% of women reported sleeping problems. Women were more likely to have a sleeping problem if they reported some difficulties with available income, odds ratio (OR) = 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): [1.27, 2.04]; p < .005, or were struggling with available income (OR = 2.84; 95% CI: [2.04, 3.96]; p < .005). Women were less likely to have sleeping problems if they were highly physically active (OR = .63; 95% CI: [0.51, 0.79]; p < .005). Discussion: Medical professionals should be aware of the significant risk of sleeping problems among mid-age and older women with chronic health conditions, particularly those who have financial concerns, are sedentary, or are not highly physically active.

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