Rural Australian Women's Legal Help Seeking for Intimate Partner Violence

Women Intimate Partner Violence Victim Survivors' Perceptions of Criminal Justice Support Services

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a widespread, ongoing, and complex global social problem, whose victims continue to be largely women. Women oftenprefer to rely on friends and family for IPV help, yet when informal support is unavailable they remain hesitant to contact formal services, particularly legalsupport for many reasons. This study applies a sociological lens by framing the IPV and legal help-seeking experiences of rural Australian women gainedfrom 36 in-depth face-to-face interviews as socially contextualized interactions. Findings reveal police and court responses reflect broader socialinequalities and rurality exacerbates concerns such as anonymity and lack of service. Cultural differences and power imbalances between survivors andformal support providers are manifested to inform future research seeking to improve survivors' willingness to engage and satisfaction with formal services. Finally, the important role police and the criminal justice system play in de-stigmatizing IPV and legitimating its unacceptability is argued a crucial, yet unrecognized, key to social change.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)685-717
Number of pages33
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume28
Issue number4
Early online dateAug 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

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Criminal Law
Survivors
Police
Social Problems
Social Change
Lenses
Interviews
Intimate Partner Violence

Cite this

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title = "Rural Australian Women's Legal Help Seeking for Intimate Partner Violence: Women Intimate Partner Violence Victim Survivors' Perceptions of Criminal Justice Support Services",
abstract = "Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a widespread, ongoing, and complex global social problem, whose victims continue to be largely women. Women oftenprefer to rely on friends and family for IPV help, yet when informal support is unavailable they remain hesitant to contact formal services, particularly legalsupport for many reasons. This study applies a sociological lens by framing the IPV and legal help-seeking experiences of rural Australian women gainedfrom 36 in-depth face-to-face interviews as socially contextualized interactions. Findings reveal police and court responses reflect broader socialinequalities and rurality exacerbates concerns such as anonymity and lack of service. Cultural differences and power imbalances between survivors andformal support providers are manifested to inform future research seeking to improve survivors' willingness to engage and satisfaction with formal services. Finally, the important role police and the criminal justice system play in de-stigmatizing IPV and legitimating its unacceptability is argued a crucial, yet unrecognized, key to social change.",
keywords = "Domestic violence, Intimate partner violence, Legal support, Rural sociology",
author = "Angela Ragusa",
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