Rurality, reasons for living, and suicidal ideation among Australian men

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Abstract

Within Australia, men who reside in rural areas are at higher risk for suicide compared to men who reside in more populated areas. The aim of the current study was to examine the role that fewer reasons for living might play in the higher rates of suicide among men who reside in rural areas by testing a mediation model. Given the protective nature of reasons for living, I proposed that rurality would be associated with fewer reasons for living which, in turn, would be associated with higher levels of suicidal ideation. A convenience sample of 609 Australian men aged from 18 to 90 years (M = 51.42, SD = 20.61) completed the Reasons for Living Inventory and the suicide subscale of the General Health Questionnaire. The mediation model was supported for Survival and Coping Beliefs, Responsibility to Family, Child-related Concerns, and Moral Objections. In addition, rurality was directly associated with higher levels of suicidal ideation. Results indicate that increasing four key reasons for living among men who live in rural areas may be beneficial for their mental health. Identifying other protective factors is important to reduce suicide among rural men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalDeath Studies
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 21 Dec 2020

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