Satisfying Justice

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Abstract

This article addresses justice as an issue in public theology. Since Christian theology and practice has engaged in violence in the name of justice (human and divine), the notion of justice is examined here so that it may better serve peace and reconciliation. In particular, the relation of justice to punishment, vengeance and morality are key issues, if justice is to serve peace. In my discussion I gain insights from South Africa's experience of the transition from apartheid to democracy, where justice became a central public issue. I bring advocates of punitive and restorative justice into conversation in order to establish what satisfies justice (punishment or healing), and I draw implications from this to how we are to understand divine justice. Finally, the atonement is reconsidered as a form of transitional justice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)319-338
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Public Theology
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Justice
Punishment
Peace
Transitional Justice
Morality
Vengeance
Reconciliation
Healing
Atonement
Restorative Justice
Divine Justice
Apartheid
Christian Theology
Public Theology
South Africa
Democracy

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title = "Satisfying Justice",
abstract = "This article addresses justice as an issue in public theology. Since Christian theology and practice has engaged in violence in the name of justice (human and divine), the notion of justice is examined here so that it may better serve peace and reconciliation. In particular, the relation of justice to punishment, vengeance and morality are key issues, if justice is to serve peace. In my discussion I gain insights from South Africa's experience of the transition from apartheid to democracy, where justice became a central public issue. I bring advocates of punitive and restorative justice into conversation in order to establish what satisfies justice (punishment or healing), and I draw implications from this to how we are to understand divine justice. Finally, the atonement is reconsidered as a form of transitional justice.",
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language = "English",
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Satisfying Justice. / Thomson, Heather.

In: International Journal of Public Theology, Vol. 3, No. 3, 2009, p. 319-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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