Scientific Imperialism and the Proper Relations between the Sciences

Stephen Clarke, Adrian Walsh

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    21 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    John Dupré argues that 'scientific imperialism' can result in 'misguided' science being considered acceptable. 'Misguided' is an explicitly normative term and the use of the pejorative 'imperialistic' is implicitly normative. However, Dupré has not justified the normative dimension of his critique. We identify two ways in which it might be justified. It might be justified if colonisation prevents a discipline from progressing in ways that it might otherwise progress. It might also be justified if colonisation prevents the expression of important values in the colonised discipline. This second concern seems most pressing in the human sciences.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)195-207
    Number of pages13
    JournalInternational Studies in the Philosophy of Science
    Volume23
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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