Self-beliefs about pain and occupational performance: A comparison of two measures used in a pain management program

Helen van Huet, Danielle Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)
47 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study evaluated the relationship between pain self-efficacy, occupational performance and satisfaction with performance in clients with chronic pain who participated in a hospital-based pain management program. Self-efficacy was measured using the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) (Nicholas, 1988). Occupational performance and satisfaction were measured using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) (Law, Baptiste, Carswell, McColl, Polatajko & Pollack, 1998). Data was collected from 64 clients who completed both PSEQ and COPM pre and post a three-week pain management program. Results of the study demonstrated a positive difference between pain self-efficacy and occupational performance (t=4.43, df=62, p<.05, and satisfaction (t= 4.02, df=62, p<.05). This research suggests that therapy should address the beliefs of clients about their ability to perform occupations when living with chronic pain (Strong, 1995), as well as adding weight to the utilisation of the PSEQ and COPM as reliable and valid assessment measures for those with chronic pain.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-12
Number of pages9
JournalOTJR Occupation, Participation and Health
Volume27
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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