Self-directed coping mechanisms in the absence of human resource policies for international employees

Debra Da Silva

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paperpeer-review

Abstract

This research examines the role of the employee who remains in a domestic location, but undertakes a role with international responsibilities, often undertaking frequent international travel. Two propositions are tested: first, that as each role is specific to the individual, HR policies either do not exist or are not applied to that situation; and second, in the absence of these HR policies, the employees develop their own coping strategies. The methodology applied to test the proposed model is a case study of a large technology MNC operation in the Asia Pacific region. Data from the in-depth interviews provided support for the two propositions. Implications of this research are important for MNCs in the development of a pool of available and mobile global managers, and in particular, how generic HR policies can be developed to support the coping mechanisms drawn on by such employees.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEURAM 2011
Subtitle of host publicationManagement Culture in the 21st Century
Place of PublicationBrussels
PublisherEURAM
Pages1-29
Number of pages29
ISBN (Electronic)9789985982471
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventAnnual Conference of the European Academy of Management - Talinn, Estonia
Duration: 01 Jun 201104 Jun 2011

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Conference of the European Academy of Management
Period01/06/1104/06/11

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