Sensory, Chemical, and Electronic Tongue Assessment of Micro-oxygenated Wines and Oak Chip Maceration

Assessing the Commonality of Analytical Techniques

Leigh Schmidtke, Alisa Rudnitskaya, Anthony Saliba, John Blackman, Geoffrey Scollary, Andrew Clark, Douglas Rutledge, Ivonne Delgadillo, Andrey Legin

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22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Micro-oxygenation (MOX) was conducted in the presence and absence of oak chips at rates to mimic oxygen ingress during barrel maturation of red wine. Following MOX, wines were analyzed for chemical attributes pertaining to phenolic composition and assessed by a trained sensory panel. An electronic tongue (ET) was also used to assess the wines. Variations in chemical attributes were found to be mostly influenced by vintage, followed by oak chip maceration accounting for 48% and 16% of variation within the data set, respectively. MOX treatment accounted for 11% of variability within the physiochemical data set, with attributes pertaining to anthocyanin polymerization and levels of sulfur dioxide in the finished wine being most significantly influenced. A generalized Procrustes rotation and alignment of the chemical, electronic tongue, and sensory data sets followed by PLS1 regressions showed good prediction of the sensory characters oak, pencil shavings, stewed plum, vegetal, and spice over the range of sensory scores from the ET data; bitterness and astringency could also be predicted from the physicochemical data with good precision.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5026-5033
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume58
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

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oak chips
Electronic tongues
electronic tongue
Electronic Nose
Wine
maceration
analytical methods
Oxygenation
wines
biochemical polymorphism
astringency
bitterness
sulfur dioxide
plums
red wines
spices
polymerization
Sulfur Dioxide
Spices
Anthocyanins

Cite this

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title = "Sensory, Chemical, and Electronic Tongue Assessment of Micro-oxygenated Wines and Oak Chip Maceration: Assessing the Commonality of Analytical Techniques",
abstract = "Micro-oxygenation (MOX) was conducted in the presence and absence of oak chips at rates to mimic oxygen ingress during barrel maturation of red wine. Following MOX, wines were analyzed for chemical attributes pertaining to phenolic composition and assessed by a trained sensory panel. An electronic tongue (ET) was also used to assess the wines. Variations in chemical attributes were found to be mostly influenced by vintage, followed by oak chip maceration accounting for 48{\%} and 16{\%} of variation within the data set, respectively. MOX treatment accounted for 11{\%} of variability within the physiochemical data set, with attributes pertaining to anthocyanin polymerization and levels of sulfur dioxide in the finished wine being most significantly influenced. A generalized Procrustes rotation and alignment of the chemical, electronic tongue, and sensory data sets followed by PLS1 regressions showed good prediction of the sensory characters oak, pencil shavings, stewed plum, vegetal, and spice over the range of sensory scores from the ET data; bitterness and astringency could also be predicted from the physicochemical data with good precision.",
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T1 - Sensory, Chemical, and Electronic Tongue Assessment of Micro-oxygenated Wines and Oak Chip Maceration

T2 - Assessing the Commonality of Analytical Techniques

AU - Schmidtke, Leigh

AU - Rudnitskaya, Alisa

AU - Saliba, Anthony

AU - Blackman, John

AU - Scollary, Geoffrey

AU - Clark, Andrew

AU - Rutledge, Douglas

AU - Delgadillo, Ivonne

AU - Legin, Andrey

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: month (773h) = April 2010; Journal title (773t) = Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. ISSNs: 0021-8561;

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N2 - Micro-oxygenation (MOX) was conducted in the presence and absence of oak chips at rates to mimic oxygen ingress during barrel maturation of red wine. Following MOX, wines were analyzed for chemical attributes pertaining to phenolic composition and assessed by a trained sensory panel. An electronic tongue (ET) was also used to assess the wines. Variations in chemical attributes were found to be mostly influenced by vintage, followed by oak chip maceration accounting for 48% and 16% of variation within the data set, respectively. MOX treatment accounted for 11% of variability within the physiochemical data set, with attributes pertaining to anthocyanin polymerization and levels of sulfur dioxide in the finished wine being most significantly influenced. A generalized Procrustes rotation and alignment of the chemical, electronic tongue, and sensory data sets followed by PLS1 regressions showed good prediction of the sensory characters oak, pencil shavings, stewed plum, vegetal, and spice over the range of sensory scores from the ET data; bitterness and astringency could also be predicted from the physicochemical data with good precision.

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