Seroprevalence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis antibodies in cattle from Wakiso, Mpigi and Luwero districts in Uganda

Julius Boniface Okuni, Panayiotis Loukopoulos, Manfred Reinacher, Lonzy Ojok

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection of cattle in selected districts in the central region of Uganda. Until recently MAP infection was unknown in any domestic or wild life species in Uganda and the neighbouring regions. To determine the extent of the challenge posed by this new threat, 943 heads of cattle from 62 herds were tested using a commercial absorbed ELISA. Of these, 3.7% were serologically positive. The estimated true prevalence was 8.8% and the proportion of herds with at least one positive reactor was 33.8%, while 11.3% of the herds had at least two positive reactors. The mean within-herd prevalence was 13% with a range of 2 to 37.5%. The prevalence of MAP antibodies among cattle of different breeds was 8.9% in Holstein Friesian, 3.7% in Zebu, 1.4% in Ankole longhorn, 9% in Guernsey and 0% in Ayrshire cattle. Cattle of three and a half years of age and above had significantly higher prevalence than younger cattle. This study has provided the first seroprevalence information on paratuberculosis in the country and to our knowledge in Africa. From this study it can be concluded that paratuberculosis is one of the important threats facing the livestock industry in Uganda and immediate action should be taken for its control. Further studies will be required in order to institute appropriate control measures.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-160
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances
Volume3
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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