Service and infrastructure needs to support recovery programmes for Indigenous community mental health consumers

Jan M. Sayers, Michelle Cleary, Glenn E. Hunt, Oliver K. Burmeister

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mental health is a major concern in Indigenous communities, as Indigenous people experience poorer health outcomes generally, and poorer social and emotional well-being throughout their lives, compared to non-Indigenous populations. Interviews were conducted with 20 mental health workers from a housing assistance programme for Indigenous clients with mental illness. Service and infrastructure needs identified to support clients were classified under the following overarching theme ‘supports along the road to recovery’. Subthemes were: (i) It is OK to seek help; (ii) linking in to the local community; (iii) trusting the workers; and (iv) help with goal setting and having activities that support their achievement. This paper highlights the importance of targeted housing and accommodation support programmes for Indigenous people to prevent homelessness, and the essential services and infrastructure required to support Indigenous clients’ mental health needs. These insights may inform service review, workforce development, and further research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)142-150
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Volume26
Issue number2
Early online dateDec 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Apr 2017

Fingerprint

Mental Health
Homeless Persons
Interviews
Health
Research
Population

Grant Number

  • 100225

Cite this

@article{bb432a88f4694f578fdae03123b8fd67,
title = "Service and infrastructure needs to support recovery programmes for Indigenous community mental health consumers",
abstract = "Mental health is a major concern in Indigenous communities, as Indigenous people experience poorer health outcomes generally, and poorer social and emotional well-being throughout their lives, compared to non-Indigenous populations. Interviews were conducted with 20 mental health workers from a housing assistance programme for Indigenous clients with mental illness. Service and infrastructure needs identified to support clients were classified under the following overarching theme ‘supports along the road to recovery’. Subthemes were: (i) It is OK to seek help; (ii) linking in to the local community; (iii) trusting the workers; and (iv) help with goal setting and having activities that support their achievement. This paper highlights the importance of targeted housing and accommodation support programmes for Indigenous people to prevent homelessness, and the essential services and infrastructure required to support Indigenous clients’ mental health needs. These insights may inform service review, workforce development, and further research.",
keywords = "housing, indigenous, mental health, mental health worker, qualitative",
author = "Sayers, {Jan M.} and Michelle Cleary and Hunt, {Glenn E.} and Burmeister, {Oliver K.}",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/inm.12287",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "142--150",
journal = "The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing",
issn = "1324-3780",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Service and infrastructure needs to support recovery programmes for Indigenous community mental health consumers

AU - Sayers, Jan M.

AU - Cleary, Michelle

AU - Hunt, Glenn E.

AU - Burmeister, Oliver K.

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - Mental health is a major concern in Indigenous communities, as Indigenous people experience poorer health outcomes generally, and poorer social and emotional well-being throughout their lives, compared to non-Indigenous populations. Interviews were conducted with 20 mental health workers from a housing assistance programme for Indigenous clients with mental illness. Service and infrastructure needs identified to support clients were classified under the following overarching theme ‘supports along the road to recovery’. Subthemes were: (i) It is OK to seek help; (ii) linking in to the local community; (iii) trusting the workers; and (iv) help with goal setting and having activities that support their achievement. This paper highlights the importance of targeted housing and accommodation support programmes for Indigenous people to prevent homelessness, and the essential services and infrastructure required to support Indigenous clients’ mental health needs. These insights may inform service review, workforce development, and further research.

AB - Mental health is a major concern in Indigenous communities, as Indigenous people experience poorer health outcomes generally, and poorer social and emotional well-being throughout their lives, compared to non-Indigenous populations. Interviews were conducted with 20 mental health workers from a housing assistance programme for Indigenous clients with mental illness. Service and infrastructure needs identified to support clients were classified under the following overarching theme ‘supports along the road to recovery’. Subthemes were: (i) It is OK to seek help; (ii) linking in to the local community; (iii) trusting the workers; and (iv) help with goal setting and having activities that support their achievement. This paper highlights the importance of targeted housing and accommodation support programmes for Indigenous people to prevent homelessness, and the essential services and infrastructure required to support Indigenous clients’ mental health needs. These insights may inform service review, workforce development, and further research.

KW - housing

KW - indigenous

KW - mental health

KW - mental health worker

KW - qualitative

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85008465342&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85008465342&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/inm.12287

DO - 10.1111/inm.12287

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 142

EP - 150

JO - The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing

JF - The Australian and New Zealand journal of mental health nursing

SN - 1324-3780

IS - 2

ER -