Service to the poor: The foundations of community nursing in England, Ireland and New South Wales

Karen Francis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    8 Citations (Scopus)
    38 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This paper describes the foundations of community nursing in England, Ireland and New South Wales. It is guided by Foucault's work on power, discourse and knowledge, and argues that the common discourse of poverty coupled with the influence of socially advantaged women in the nineteenth century was the impetus for the development of community nursing in England, Ireland and New South Wales. Throughout the nineteenth century in Great Britain, economic and industrial development, coupled with an unprecedented growth in the population (particularly among the poor) inspired socially advantaged women to extend traditional gender-specific roles to address the needs of the poor. Protestant women in England advanced professional nursing as a career for women and in Ireland and New South Wales; Catholic women pioneered professional nursing, targeting the poor as the focus of their practice. These women used prevailing social conditions to enhance their life options within the limits prescribed by social norms.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)169-176
    Number of pages8
    JournalInternational Journal of Nursing Practice
    Volume7
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2001

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