Servicing Students: Understanding Students' Interactions with People and Processes Using Online Tools

Felicity Small, David Dowell, Heather Crawford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine students' experiences with online tools and how these tools can facilitate students' interactions with peers, lecturers, content, and administration. The sample was drawn from five countries: Australia (n = 502), United States (n = 498), United Kingdom (n = 529), India (n = 618), and China (n = 569). ANOVA and MANOVA were used to analyze the results. The key findings are that students, across all five subsamples, find lectures the most important tool, online submission of assessments is the most satisfying, and online assessments are meeting expectations. Findings suggest e-learning should be focused on student-to-teacher and administration interactions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-224
Number of pages16
JournalServices Marketing Quarterly
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Servicing
Interaction
Peers
Electronic learning
Multivariate analysis of variance
Analysis of variance
India
China

Cite this

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Servicing Students : Understanding Students' Interactions with People and Processes Using Online Tools. / Small, Felicity; Dowell, David; Crawford, Heather.

In: Services Marketing Quarterly, Vol. 37, No. 4, 2016, p. 209-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - Understanding Students' Interactions with People and Processes Using Online Tools

AU - Small, Felicity

AU - Dowell, David

AU - Crawford, Heather

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