Sexual orientation concealment, hope, and depressive symptoms among gay and bisexual men: a moderated-moderation model

Jordana Paris Csoti, Suzanne McLaren

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Abstract

The prevalence of depressive symptoms among gay and bisexual men is cause for concern. This study aimed to investigate whether hope and its two components (agency and pathways) moderated the relationship between sexual orientation concealment and depressive symptoms in gay and bisexual men and whether the moderating effects were conditional on sexual orientation. Participants were 197 gay men aged 18 to 71 years (M = 35.13 years, SD = 12.18 years) and 212 bisexual men aged 18 to 66 years (M = 29.24 years, SD = 10.46 years) who completed The Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, The Sexual Orientation Concealment Scale, and The Adult Hope Scale. Results did not support the moderating role of hope, agency, or pathways. The interaction between sexual orientation and pathways was significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Higher levels of pathways were associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms for both groups of men, however, the association was stronger for gay men compared with bisexual men. Higher levels of hope, agency, and pathways were associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms. Interventions aimed at increasing hope may be beneficial for reducing depressive symptoms among gay and bisexual men.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychology and Sexuality
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

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