Significant features of the epidemiology of equine influenza in New South Wales, Australia, 2007

B Moloney, ESG Sergeant, C Taragel, Petra Buckley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Equine influenza (EI) was first diagnosed in the Australian horse population on 24 August 2007 at Centennial Park Equestrian Centre (CPEC) in Sydney, New South Wales (NSW), Australia. By then, the virus had already spread to many properties in NSW and southern Queensland. The outbreak in NSW affected approximately 6000 premises populated by approximately 47,000 horses. Analyses undertaken by the epidemiology section, a distinct unit within the planning section of the State Disease Control Headquarters, included the attack risk on affected properties, the level of under-reporting of affected properties and a risk assessment of the movement of horses out of the Special Restricted Area. We describe the epidemiological features and the lessons learned from the outbreak in NSW.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-63
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian Veterinary Journal
Volume89
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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equine influenza
South Australia
New South Wales
Human Influenza
Horses
epidemiology
Epidemiology
horses
Disease Outbreaks
Queensland
risk assessment
disease control
planning
Viruses
viruses
Population

Cite this

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Significant features of the epidemiology of equine influenza in New South Wales, Australia, 2007. / Moloney, B; Sergeant, ESG; Taragel, C; Buckley, Petra.

In: Australian Veterinary Journal, Vol. 89, No. 1, 2011, p. 56-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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