Smallholder farmer innovation. 2. Facilitating farmer agency through experimentation

Ritesh Pandey, Gavin Ramsay, Bill Bellotti

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Learning, and in particular generating new knowledge, appears to have played a role in transforming the lives of poor women farmers on the east India Plateau. Learning and knowledge generation seem to have increased their self-esteem and generated a desire to learn more as well as improving their physical well-being and position in society This paper describes our experience working with resource poor smallholder farmers on the East India Plateau to develop more diverse and intensive farming systems. Our focus is on developing the capacity of individuals for independent innovation rather than their skill in the application of specific agricultural technologies. Facilitating learning experiences through on-farm research on topics chosen by the community is central to our approach. Individual farmers learn from each other in self-help groups that provide a forum for farmer-scientist interaction. Locally developed vegetable cash crops and aerobic direct seeded rice are popular with farmers and adoption is expanding rapidly. Much of the local adaptation and dissemination is being driven by farmer-to-farmer communication and learning. Our experience confirms that despite often extreme poverty, malnutrition and discrimination these communities demonstrate high human capacity for innovation. Rather than a specific technology or cropping system, the real legacy of our approach is cognitive development in farmers, changing their perception of the environment in which they are working and enhancing their capacity for independent innovation in the face of increasing complexity and uncertainty.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherAustralian Society of Agronomy
Pages1-4
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event17th Australian Agronomy Conference - Wrest Point Convention Centre , Hobart, Australia
Duration: 20 Sep 201524 Sep 2015

Conference

Conference17th Australian Agronomy Conference
Abbreviated titleBuilding Productive, Diverse and Sustainable Landscapes
CountryAustralia
CityHobart
Period20/09/1524/09/15

Fingerprint

farmers
learning
plateaus
women in agriculture
on-farm research
cognitive development
self-esteem
India
cash crops
intensive farming
vegetable crops
communication (human)
poverty
malnutrition
cropping systems
uncertainty
farming systems
rice

Cite this

Pandey, R., Ramsay, G., & Bellotti, B. (2015). Smallholder farmer innovation. 2. Facilitating farmer agency through experimentation. In 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference (pp. 1-4). Australia: Australian Society of Agronomy.
Pandey, Ritesh ; Ramsay, Gavin ; Bellotti, Bill. / Smallholder farmer innovation. 2. Facilitating farmer agency through experimentation. 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference. Australia : Australian Society of Agronomy, 2015. pp. 1-4
@inproceedings{48b378cc0e2b40918ce2d4b08112cc39,
title = "Smallholder farmer innovation. 2. Facilitating farmer agency through experimentation",
abstract = "Learning, and in particular generating new knowledge, appears to have played a role in transforming the lives of poor women farmers on the east India Plateau. Learning and knowledge generation seem to have increased their self-esteem and generated a desire to learn more as well as improving their physical well-being and position in society This paper describes our experience working with resource poor smallholder farmers on the East India Plateau to develop more diverse and intensive farming systems. Our focus is on developing the capacity of individuals for independent innovation rather than their skill in the application of specific agricultural technologies. Facilitating learning experiences through on-farm research on topics chosen by the community is central to our approach. Individual farmers learn from each other in self-help groups that provide a forum for farmer-scientist interaction. Locally developed vegetable cash crops and aerobic direct seeded rice are popular with farmers and adoption is expanding rapidly. Much of the local adaptation and dissemination is being driven by farmer-to-farmer communication and learning. Our experience confirms that despite often extreme poverty, malnutrition and discrimination these communities demonstrate high human capacity for innovation. Rather than a specific technology or cropping system, the real legacy of our approach is cognitive development in farmers, changing their perception of the environment in which they are working and enhancing their capacity for independent innovation in the face of increasing complexity and uncertainty.",
author = "Ritesh Pandey and Gavin Ramsay and Bill Bellotti",
note = "Imported on 03 May 2017 - DigiTool details were: publisher = Australian Society of Agronomy, 2015. Event dates (773o) = 20-24 September 2015; Parent title (773t) = 17th Australian Agronomy Conference.",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
pages = "1--4",
booktitle = "17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference",
publisher = "Australian Society of Agronomy",

}

Pandey, R, Ramsay, G & Bellotti, B 2015, Smallholder farmer innovation. 2. Facilitating farmer agency through experimentation. in 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference. Australian Society of Agronomy, Australia, pp. 1-4, 17th Australian Agronomy Conference, Hobart, Australia, 20/09/15.

Smallholder farmer innovation. 2. Facilitating farmer agency through experimentation. / Pandey, Ritesh; Ramsay, Gavin; Bellotti, Bill.

17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference. Australia : Australian Society of Agronomy, 2015. p. 1-4.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

TY - GEN

T1 - Smallholder farmer innovation. 2. Facilitating farmer agency through experimentation

AU - Pandey, Ritesh

AU - Ramsay, Gavin

AU - Bellotti, Bill

N1 - Imported on 03 May 2017 - DigiTool details were: publisher = Australian Society of Agronomy, 2015. Event dates (773o) = 20-24 September 2015; Parent title (773t) = 17th Australian Agronomy Conference.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Learning, and in particular generating new knowledge, appears to have played a role in transforming the lives of poor women farmers on the east India Plateau. Learning and knowledge generation seem to have increased their self-esteem and generated a desire to learn more as well as improving their physical well-being and position in society This paper describes our experience working with resource poor smallholder farmers on the East India Plateau to develop more diverse and intensive farming systems. Our focus is on developing the capacity of individuals for independent innovation rather than their skill in the application of specific agricultural technologies. Facilitating learning experiences through on-farm research on topics chosen by the community is central to our approach. Individual farmers learn from each other in self-help groups that provide a forum for farmer-scientist interaction. Locally developed vegetable cash crops and aerobic direct seeded rice are popular with farmers and adoption is expanding rapidly. Much of the local adaptation and dissemination is being driven by farmer-to-farmer communication and learning. Our experience confirms that despite often extreme poverty, malnutrition and discrimination these communities demonstrate high human capacity for innovation. Rather than a specific technology or cropping system, the real legacy of our approach is cognitive development in farmers, changing their perception of the environment in which they are working and enhancing their capacity for independent innovation in the face of increasing complexity and uncertainty.

AB - Learning, and in particular generating new knowledge, appears to have played a role in transforming the lives of poor women farmers on the east India Plateau. Learning and knowledge generation seem to have increased their self-esteem and generated a desire to learn more as well as improving their physical well-being and position in society This paper describes our experience working with resource poor smallholder farmers on the East India Plateau to develop more diverse and intensive farming systems. Our focus is on developing the capacity of individuals for independent innovation rather than their skill in the application of specific agricultural technologies. Facilitating learning experiences through on-farm research on topics chosen by the community is central to our approach. Individual farmers learn from each other in self-help groups that provide a forum for farmer-scientist interaction. Locally developed vegetable cash crops and aerobic direct seeded rice are popular with farmers and adoption is expanding rapidly. Much of the local adaptation and dissemination is being driven by farmer-to-farmer communication and learning. Our experience confirms that despite often extreme poverty, malnutrition and discrimination these communities demonstrate high human capacity for innovation. Rather than a specific technology or cropping system, the real legacy of our approach is cognitive development in farmers, changing their perception of the environment in which they are working and enhancing their capacity for independent innovation in the face of increasing complexity and uncertainty.

M3 - Conference paper

SP - 1

EP - 4

BT - 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference

PB - Australian Society of Agronomy

CY - Australia

ER -

Pandey R, Ramsay G, Bellotti B. Smallholder farmer innovation. 2. Facilitating farmer agency through experimentation. In 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference. Australia: Australian Society of Agronomy. 2015. p. 1-4