Spatial variation in soil organic carbon and nitrogen at two field sites under crop and pasture rotations in southern New South Wales, Australia

Mark Conyers, Beverley Orchard, Susan Orgill, Albert Oates, Graeme Poile, Richard Hayes, Peter Hawkins, Binbin Xu, Yan Jia, Vince Van Der Rijt, Guangdi Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Estimating the likely variance in soil organic carbon (OC) at the scale of farm fields or smaller monitoring areas is necessary for developing sampling protocols that allow temporal change to be detected. Given the relatively low anticipated soil OC sequestration rates (<0.5 Mg/ha.0.30 m/year) for dryland agriculture it is important that sampling strategies are designed to reduce any cumulative errors associated with measuring soil OC. The first purpose of this study was to evaluate the spatial variation in soil OC and nitrogen (N), in soil layers to 1.50 m depth at two monitoring sites (Wagga Wagga and Yerong Creek, 0.5 ha each) in southern New South Wales, Australia, where crop and pasture rotations are practiced. Four variogram models were tested (linear, spherical, Gaussian and exponential) however, no single model dominated across sites or depths for OC or N. At both sites, the range was smallest in surface soil, and on a scale suggesting that sowing rows (stubble) may dominate the pattern of spatial dependence, whereas the longer ranges appeared to be associated with horizon boundaries. The second purpose of the study was to obtain an estimate of the population mean with 1%, 5% and 10% levels of precision using the calculated variance. The number of soil cores required for a 1% precision in estimation of the mean soil OC or N was impractical at most depths (>500 per ha). About 30 soil cores per composite sample to 1.50 m depth, each core being at least 10 m apart, would ensure at least an average of 10% precision in the estimation of the mean soil OC at these two sites, which represent the agriculture of the region.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)780-792
Number of pages13
JournalSoil Research
Volume56
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Nov 2018

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