Speech sound disorders in preschool children

Correspondence between clinical diagnosis and teacher and parent report

Linda J. Harrison, Sharynne McLeod, Lindy McAllister, Jane McCormack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study sought to assess the level of correspondence between parent and teacher report of concern about young children’s speech and specialist assessment of speech sound disorders (SSD). A sample of 157 children aged 4–5 years was recruited in preschools and long day care centres in Victoria and New South Wales (NSW). SSD was assessed independently by: (1) clinical diagnosis by a speech-language pathologist using the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology; (2) parent-reported concern using the Parent Evaluation of Developmental Status (PEDS); (3) teacher-reported concern using the PEDS. Agreement between parent identification of SSD and clinical assessment was high (86–90%). Agreement between teacher identification and clinical assessment was lower, and varied by state (Victoria 80%; NSW 63%). Differences in the accuracy of early childhood teachers’ identification of SSD are considered in relation to early childhood policies regarding the provision of speech-language pathology services in preschool settings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-48
Number of pages14
JournalAustralian Journal of Learning Difficulties
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Preschool Children
preschool child
parents
New South Wales
Victoria
teacher
Speech-Language Pathology
evaluation
childhood
Language
day care
phonology
language
Speech Sound Disorder
pathology
diagnostic

Cite this

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