Spirits, Miracles and Clauses: Economy, Patriarchy and Childhood in Popular Christmas Texts

Sue Saltmarsh

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    Abstract

    The meanings and practices associated with the celebration of Christmas occupy a notable place in the study of cultural and social histories, where there is particular emphasis on the tensions between Christmas and capital (Clark 1995). As a festival with both religious and secular associations, Christmas is both mythologised and 'sacralized' in the combination of "mythical themes and…ritual consumption" (Belk 2005, p. 101)—such that there is considerable elision between the traditional association of Christmas with notions of generosity, good will, and childhood innocence and wonder, and those of consumption and commercialism
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)5-18
    Number of pages14
    JournalPapers: Explorations into Children's Literature
    Volume17
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - May 2007

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