Stakeholder judgements of the social acceptability of control practices for kangaroos, unmanaged goat and feral pigs in the south-eastern rangelands of Australia

Katrina Sinclair, Allan Curtis, R. B. Hacker, T. Atkinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Total grazing pressure (TGP) is a key driver of productivity in livestock systems in the south-eastern rangelands of Australia. Sustainable grazing in these environments requires the management of grazing pressure from kangaroos, unmanaged goats and feral pigs, as well as livestock. Any practices used to control these species must be socially acceptable. Twenty-four semi-structured interviews with individuals drawn from key stakeholder groups were conducted to assess the acceptability of control practices for each of these species. Commercial shooting was the most acceptable control practice for kangaroos with a much lower acceptance of non-commercial shooting. A trap yard (at a water point) was the most acceptable practice for control of unmanaged goats with shooting least acceptable. Ground shooting, trapping and 1080 baiting were the most acceptable practices for control of feral pigs with dogging least acceptable. The two key criteria for social acceptance of control practices by stakeholder group interviewees were humaneness and effectiveness. Acceptance was also influenced by interviewees’ attitudes towards particular species. Interviewees typically distinguished between control of native wildlife and ‘feral’ animals, and between ‘resource’ animals and ‘pest’ animals. Importantly, support for control programs to manage TGP must be justifiable and employ practices that are socially acceptable.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485-496
Number of pages12
JournalRangeland Journal
Volume41
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 24 Mar 2020

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