Stomatal response of an anisohydric grapevine cultivar to evaporative demand, available soil moisture and abscisic acid

Suzy Rogiers, Dennis Greer, Jo Hatfield, Ronald Hutton, Simon Clarke, Paul Hutchinson, Anthony Somers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Stomatal responsiveness to evaporative demand (air vapour pressure deficit (VPD)) ranges widely between species and cultivars, and mechanisms for stomatal control in response to VPD remain obscure. The interaction of irrigation and soil moisture with VPD on stomatal conductance is particularly difficult to predict, but nevertheless is critical to instantaneous transpiration and vulnerability to desiccation. Stomatal sensitivity to VPD and soil moisture was investigated in Semillon, an anisohydric Vitis vinifera L. variety whose leaf water potential (Ψ l) is frequently lower than that of other grapevine varieties grown under similar conditions in the warm grape-growing regions of Australia. A survey of Semillon vines across seven vineyards revealed that, regardless of irrigation treatment, midday Ψ l was dependent on not only soil moisture but VPD at the time of measurement. Predawn Ψ l was more closely correlated to not only soil moisture in dry vineyards but to night-time VPD in drip-irrigated vineyards, with incomplete rehydration during high night-time VPD. Daytime stomatal conductance was low only under severe plant water deficits, induced by extremes in dry soil. Stomatal response to VPD was inconsistent across irrigation regime; however, in an unirrigated vineyard, stomatal sensitivity to VPD - the magnitude of stomatal response to VPD - was heightened under dry soils. It was also found that stomatal sensitivity was proportional to the magnitude of stomatal conductance at a reference VPD of 1kPa. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) applied to roots of Semillon vines growing in a hydroponic system induced stomatal closure and, in field vines, petiole xylem sap ABA concentrations rose throughout the morning and were higher in vines with low Ψwas heightened under dry soils. It was also found that. These data indicate that despite high stomatal conductance of this anisohydric variety when grown in medium to high soil moisture, increased concentrations of ABA as a result of very limited soil moisture may augment stomatal responsiveness to low VPD. © 2011 The Author.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-261
Number of pages13
JournalTree Physiology
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Vapor Pressure
Abscisic Acid
vapor pressure
abscisic acid
Soil
soil water
cultivars
vineyards
vines
stomatal conductance
Vitis
evaporative demand
irrigation
Hydroponics
Air Pressure
Xylem
soil
Desiccation
plant-water relations
Water

Cite this

Rogiers, Suzy ; Greer, Dennis ; Hatfield, Jo ; Hutton, Ronald ; Clarke, Simon ; Hutchinson, Paul ; Somers, Anthony. / Stomatal response of an anisohydric grapevine cultivar to evaporative demand, available soil moisture and abscisic acid. In: Tree Physiology. 2012 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 249-261.
@article{9e6bdcf5c143424893455f3f429288f5,
title = "Stomatal response of an anisohydric grapevine cultivar to evaporative demand, available soil moisture and abscisic acid",
abstract = "Stomatal responsiveness to evaporative demand (air vapour pressure deficit (VPD)) ranges widely between species and cultivars, and mechanisms for stomatal control in response to VPD remain obscure. The interaction of irrigation and soil moisture with VPD on stomatal conductance is particularly difficult to predict, but nevertheless is critical to instantaneous transpiration and vulnerability to desiccation. Stomatal sensitivity to VPD and soil moisture was investigated in Semillon, an anisohydric Vitis vinifera L. variety whose leaf water potential (Ψ l) is frequently lower than that of other grapevine varieties grown under similar conditions in the warm grape-growing regions of Australia. A survey of Semillon vines across seven vineyards revealed that, regardless of irrigation treatment, midday Ψ l was dependent on not only soil moisture but VPD at the time of measurement. Predawn Ψ l was more closely correlated to not only soil moisture in dry vineyards but to night-time VPD in drip-irrigated vineyards, with incomplete rehydration during high night-time VPD. Daytime stomatal conductance was low only under severe plant water deficits, induced by extremes in dry soil. Stomatal response to VPD was inconsistent across irrigation regime; however, in an unirrigated vineyard, stomatal sensitivity to VPD - the magnitude of stomatal response to VPD - was heightened under dry soils. It was also found that stomatal sensitivity was proportional to the magnitude of stomatal conductance at a reference VPD of 1kPa. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) applied to roots of Semillon vines growing in a hydroponic system induced stomatal closure and, in field vines, petiole xylem sap ABA concentrations rose throughout the morning and were higher in vines with low Ψwas heightened under dry soils. It was also found that. These data indicate that despite high stomatal conductance of this anisohydric variety when grown in medium to high soil moisture, increased concentrations of ABA as a result of very limited soil moisture may augment stomatal responsiveness to low VPD. {\circledC} 2011 The Author.",
keywords = "Drought responses, Semillon, Stomatal regulation, Transpiration, VPD, Water relations",
author = "Suzy Rogiers and Dennis Greer and Jo Hatfield and Ronald Hutton and Simon Clarke and Paul Hutchinson and Anthony Somers",
note = "Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Tree Physiology: an international botanical journal. ISSNs: 0829-318X;",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1093/treephys/tpr131",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "249--261",
journal = "Tree Physiology",
issn = "0829-318X",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "3",

}

Stomatal response of an anisohydric grapevine cultivar to evaporative demand, available soil moisture and abscisic acid. / Rogiers, Suzy; Greer, Dennis; Hatfield, Jo; Hutton, Ronald; Clarke, Simon; Hutchinson, Paul; Somers, Anthony.

In: Tree Physiology, Vol. 32, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 249-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Stomatal response of an anisohydric grapevine cultivar to evaporative demand, available soil moisture and abscisic acid

AU - Rogiers, Suzy

AU - Greer, Dennis

AU - Hatfield, Jo

AU - Hutton, Ronald

AU - Clarke, Simon

AU - Hutchinson, Paul

AU - Somers, Anthony

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Tree Physiology: an international botanical journal. ISSNs: 0829-318X;

PY - 2012/3

Y1 - 2012/3

N2 - Stomatal responsiveness to evaporative demand (air vapour pressure deficit (VPD)) ranges widely between species and cultivars, and mechanisms for stomatal control in response to VPD remain obscure. The interaction of irrigation and soil moisture with VPD on stomatal conductance is particularly difficult to predict, but nevertheless is critical to instantaneous transpiration and vulnerability to desiccation. Stomatal sensitivity to VPD and soil moisture was investigated in Semillon, an anisohydric Vitis vinifera L. variety whose leaf water potential (Ψ l) is frequently lower than that of other grapevine varieties grown under similar conditions in the warm grape-growing regions of Australia. A survey of Semillon vines across seven vineyards revealed that, regardless of irrigation treatment, midday Ψ l was dependent on not only soil moisture but VPD at the time of measurement. Predawn Ψ l was more closely correlated to not only soil moisture in dry vineyards but to night-time VPD in drip-irrigated vineyards, with incomplete rehydration during high night-time VPD. Daytime stomatal conductance was low only under severe plant water deficits, induced by extremes in dry soil. Stomatal response to VPD was inconsistent across irrigation regime; however, in an unirrigated vineyard, stomatal sensitivity to VPD - the magnitude of stomatal response to VPD - was heightened under dry soils. It was also found that stomatal sensitivity was proportional to the magnitude of stomatal conductance at a reference VPD of 1kPa. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) applied to roots of Semillon vines growing in a hydroponic system induced stomatal closure and, in field vines, petiole xylem sap ABA concentrations rose throughout the morning and were higher in vines with low Ψwas heightened under dry soils. It was also found that. These data indicate that despite high stomatal conductance of this anisohydric variety when grown in medium to high soil moisture, increased concentrations of ABA as a result of very limited soil moisture may augment stomatal responsiveness to low VPD. © 2011 The Author.

AB - Stomatal responsiveness to evaporative demand (air vapour pressure deficit (VPD)) ranges widely between species and cultivars, and mechanisms for stomatal control in response to VPD remain obscure. The interaction of irrigation and soil moisture with VPD on stomatal conductance is particularly difficult to predict, but nevertheless is critical to instantaneous transpiration and vulnerability to desiccation. Stomatal sensitivity to VPD and soil moisture was investigated in Semillon, an anisohydric Vitis vinifera L. variety whose leaf water potential (Ψ l) is frequently lower than that of other grapevine varieties grown under similar conditions in the warm grape-growing regions of Australia. A survey of Semillon vines across seven vineyards revealed that, regardless of irrigation treatment, midday Ψ l was dependent on not only soil moisture but VPD at the time of measurement. Predawn Ψ l was more closely correlated to not only soil moisture in dry vineyards but to night-time VPD in drip-irrigated vineyards, with incomplete rehydration during high night-time VPD. Daytime stomatal conductance was low only under severe plant water deficits, induced by extremes in dry soil. Stomatal response to VPD was inconsistent across irrigation regime; however, in an unirrigated vineyard, stomatal sensitivity to VPD - the magnitude of stomatal response to VPD - was heightened under dry soils. It was also found that stomatal sensitivity was proportional to the magnitude of stomatal conductance at a reference VPD of 1kPa. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) applied to roots of Semillon vines growing in a hydroponic system induced stomatal closure and, in field vines, petiole xylem sap ABA concentrations rose throughout the morning and were higher in vines with low Ψwas heightened under dry soils. It was also found that. These data indicate that despite high stomatal conductance of this anisohydric variety when grown in medium to high soil moisture, increased concentrations of ABA as a result of very limited soil moisture may augment stomatal responsiveness to low VPD. © 2011 The Author.

KW - Drought responses

KW - Semillon

KW - Stomatal regulation

KW - Transpiration

KW - VPD

KW - Water relations

U2 - 10.1093/treephys/tpr131

DO - 10.1093/treephys/tpr131

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 249

EP - 261

JO - Tree Physiology

JF - Tree Physiology

SN - 0829-318X

IS - 3

ER -