Stone structures as potential aggregation sites for coccinellids in managed landscapes

Manu Saunders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are predators of aphid and psyllid species and are often released or encouraged into timber plantations as natural enemies of economic pests. Some temperate coccinellid species overwinter in mass aggregations; however, little is known about coccinellid aggregations in Australia. Aggregations of 'Harmonia conformis' were observed only on stone walls of a camp shelter near Shelley, Victoria in July 2014. Publication of more observational records and dedicated surveys will determine if old stone walls and buildings in managed landscapes have the potential to provide overwintering habitat for natural enemies and other beneficial insects.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)86-88
Number of pages3
JournalVictorian Naturalist
Volume132
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2015

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