Structural and kinetic characterization of the SpeG spermidine/spermine N-acetyltransferase from methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus USA300

Sofiya Tsimbalyuk, Aleksander Shornikov, Parul Srivastava, Van Thi Bich Le, Imani Warren, Yogesh B. Khandokar, Misty L. Kuhn, Jade K. Forwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Polyamines are simple yet critical molecules with diverse roles in numerous pathogenic and non-pathogenic organisms. Regulating polyamine concentrations affects the transcription and translation of genes and proteins important for cell growth, stress, and toxicity. One way polyamine concentrations are maintained within the cell is via spermidine/spermine N-acetyltransferases (SSATs) that acetylate intracellular polyamines so they can be exported. The bacterial SpeG enzyme is an SSAT that exhibits a unique dodecameric structure and allosteric site compared to other SSATs that have been previously characterized. While its overall 3D structure is conserved, its presence and role in different bacterial pathogens are inconsistent. For example, not all bacteria have speG encoded in their genomes; in some bacteria, the speG gene is present but has become silenced, and in other bacteria, it has been acquired on mobile genetic elements. The latter is the case for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) USA300, where it appears to aid pathogenesis. To gain a greater understanding of the structure/function relationship of SpeG from the MRSA USA300 strain (SaSpeG), we determined its X-ray crystal structure in the presence and absence of spermine. Additionally, we showed the oligomeric state of SaSpeG is dynamic, and its homogeneity is affected by polyamines and AcCoA. Enzyme kinetic assays showed that pre-incubation with polyamines significantly affected the positive cooperativity toward spermine and spermidine and the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Furthermore, we showed bacterial SpeG enzymes do not have equivalent capabilities to acetylate aminopropyl versus aminbutyl ends of spermidine. Overall, this study provides new insight that will assist in understanding the SpeG enzyme and its role in pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria at a molecular level.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1829
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalCells
Volume12
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2023

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