Student-Customers as Actors in Employment Relations: The Case of Australian Higher Education

Jennifer Sappey

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter

Abstract

Traditionally, serving one's customers has meant providing goods or services (as requested by the customer) and doing so with courtesy (as defined by social custom). The customer was clearly outside the employment relationship, although a focus of its output. Contemporary management practices have seen the strategic extension of customer service under the mantel of customer relations in which management seeks to construct a mutually satisfying, social relationship with its customer, in order to secure brand loyalty and competitive advantage. A relationship implies interaction, interdependence and the potential to share decision-making and power, albeit to varying degrees. The question then arises, at an organisational level when customer relations and employment relations intersect, are customers actors in the industrial relations system?
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNew Employment Actors
Subtitle of host publicationDevelopment from Australia
Place of PublicationBern, Switzerland
PublisherPeter Lang Publishing
Pages153-172
Number of pages20
Edition7
ISBN (Print)9783039114610
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Student-Customers as Actors in Employment Relations: The Case of Australian Higher Education'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Sappey, J. (2008). Student-Customers as Actors in Employment Relations: The Case of Australian Higher Education. In New Employment Actors: Development from Australia (7 ed., pp. 153-172). Peter Lang Publishing.