Superficial social inclusion? Reflections from first-time distance learners

Mark Brown, Helen Hughes, Natasha Hard, Michael Keppell, Elizabeth Smith

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

Abstract

This paper will report on a research project that sought to investigate the experiences of first-time distance learners from their own perspectives, using their own words collected through video diaries. The research took place against a background of low retention and completion rates among distance students, which brings in to question what actually happens to learners once they are enrolled. While the project will ultimately generate evidence-based deliverables targeted at both distance education providers and distance learners, this session will report on a selection of learner stories that have highlighted the issue of superficial social inclusion in the absence of support and engagement strategies that reach out at the point of need throughout the study lifecycle. Participants of this session will be asked to reflect on the challenge of supporting distance students to engage effectively with study amid other commitments; whilst being mindful that, to survive the distance, they need to be independent, self-motivated learners.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International First Year in Higher Education Conference 2012
EditorsRachel Mortimer
PublisherQUT Events
Pages1-5
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-921897-39-9
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event15th International First Year in Higher Education Conference (FYHE 2012) - Sofitel Brisbane Central, Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 26 Jun 201229 Jun 2012
http://fyhe.com.au/past_papers/papers12/FYHE%20Proceedings.pdf

Conference

Conference15th International First Year in Higher Education Conference (FYHE 2012)
Abbreviated titleNew Horizons
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period26/06/1229/06/12
Internet address

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