Synergizing biological control: Scope for sterile insect technique, induced plant defences and cultural techniques to enhance natural enemy impact

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Abstract

When used alone, only a minority of biological control programs succeed in bringing the target pest population under sufficient control. Biological control is, therefore, usually employed with chemical, cultural, genetic or other methods in an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy. The interactions between different pest management methods, especially conventional pesticides and host plant resistance, is an area of growing research interest but relatively little consideration is given to novel combinations. This paper reviews the interactions between biological control and other forms of pest management, especially induced plant defences and the novel, non-toxic plant protection compounds that may boost these defences; and sterile insect technique. We also cover the cultural methods that offer scope to support synergies between the aforementioned methodological combinations. We conclude that despite the sometimes negative consequences of other pest management techniques for biological control efficacy, there is great scope for new strategies to be developed that exploit synergies between biological control and various other techniques. Ultimately, however, we propose that future use of biological control will involve integration at a greater conceptual scale such that this important form of pest management is promoted as one of a suite of ecosystem services that can be engineered into farming systems and wider landscapes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)198-207
Number of pages10
JournalBiological Control
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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sterile insect technique
natural enemies
biological control
pest management
methodology
integrated pest management
plant cultural practices
plant protection
ecosystem services
pesticides
host plants
farming systems
pests

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title = "Synergizing biological control: Scope for sterile insect technique, induced plant defences and cultural techniques to enhance natural enemy impact",
abstract = "When used alone, only a minority of biological control programs succeed in bringing the target pest population under sufficient control. Biological control is, therefore, usually employed with chemical, cultural, genetic or other methods in an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy. The interactions between different pest management methods, especially conventional pesticides and host plant resistance, is an area of growing research interest but relatively little consideration is given to novel combinations. This paper reviews the interactions between biological control and other forms of pest management, especially induced plant defences and the novel, non-toxic plant protection compounds that may boost these defences; and sterile insect technique. We also cover the cultural methods that offer scope to support synergies between the aforementioned methodological combinations. We conclude that despite the sometimes negative consequences of other pest management techniques for biological control efficacy, there is great scope for new strategies to be developed that exploit synergies between biological control and various other techniques. Ultimately, however, we propose that future use of biological control will involve integration at a greater conceptual scale such that this important form of pest management is promoted as one of a suite of ecosystem services that can be engineered into farming systems and wider landscapes.",
keywords = "Ecological engineering, Ecosystem services, Herbivore induced plant volatiles, Induced defenses, Induced plant defences, Integrated pest management, Landscapes, Silicon",
author = "Geoffrey Gurr and Olivia Reynolds",
note = "Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Biological Control. ISSNs: 1049-9644;",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1016/j.biocontrol.2009.02.013",
language = "English",
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pages = "198--207",
journal = "Biological Control",
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T1 - Synergizing biological control

T2 - Scope for sterile insect technique, induced plant defences and cultural techniques to enhance natural enemy impact

AU - Gurr, Geoffrey

AU - Reynolds, Olivia

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Biological Control. ISSNs: 1049-9644;

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - When used alone, only a minority of biological control programs succeed in bringing the target pest population under sufficient control. Biological control is, therefore, usually employed with chemical, cultural, genetic or other methods in an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy. The interactions between different pest management methods, especially conventional pesticides and host plant resistance, is an area of growing research interest but relatively little consideration is given to novel combinations. This paper reviews the interactions between biological control and other forms of pest management, especially induced plant defences and the novel, non-toxic plant protection compounds that may boost these defences; and sterile insect technique. We also cover the cultural methods that offer scope to support synergies between the aforementioned methodological combinations. We conclude that despite the sometimes negative consequences of other pest management techniques for biological control efficacy, there is great scope for new strategies to be developed that exploit synergies between biological control and various other techniques. Ultimately, however, we propose that future use of biological control will involve integration at a greater conceptual scale such that this important form of pest management is promoted as one of a suite of ecosystem services that can be engineered into farming systems and wider landscapes.

AB - When used alone, only a minority of biological control programs succeed in bringing the target pest population under sufficient control. Biological control is, therefore, usually employed with chemical, cultural, genetic or other methods in an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy. The interactions between different pest management methods, especially conventional pesticides and host plant resistance, is an area of growing research interest but relatively little consideration is given to novel combinations. This paper reviews the interactions between biological control and other forms of pest management, especially induced plant defences and the novel, non-toxic plant protection compounds that may boost these defences; and sterile insect technique. We also cover the cultural methods that offer scope to support synergies between the aforementioned methodological combinations. We conclude that despite the sometimes negative consequences of other pest management techniques for biological control efficacy, there is great scope for new strategies to be developed that exploit synergies between biological control and various other techniques. Ultimately, however, we propose that future use of biological control will involve integration at a greater conceptual scale such that this important form of pest management is promoted as one of a suite of ecosystem services that can be engineered into farming systems and wider landscapes.

KW - Ecological engineering

KW - Ecosystem services

KW - Herbivore induced plant volatiles

KW - Induced defenses

KW - Induced plant defences

KW - Integrated pest management

KW - Landscapes

KW - Silicon

U2 - 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2009.02.013

DO - 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2009.02.013

M3 - Article

VL - 52

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EP - 207

JO - Biological Control

JF - Biological Control

SN - 1049-9644

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ER -