Teaching Intelligence in the twenty first century: Towards an evidence-based approach for curriculum design

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since 9/11, the ‘Five Eyes’ countries have seen a dramatic rise in intelligence training and education courses across the national security and law enforcement contexts. However, there remains little publicly available empirical evidence to demonstrate specifically where improvements have been made to workplace practices and processes as a result of this investment. This article, argues that the education sector in the intelligence discipline lacks an evaluation research agenda, for validating the workplace effectiveness of training and education programs. Further, a first step in understanding whether curriculum are ‘fit for purpose’ may be articulating some underlying common normative principles for evaluating programs in any intelligence context.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1005-1021
Number of pages16
JournalIntelligence and National Security
Volume32
Issue number7
Early online dateJun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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