Teaching nursing students to respond to patient deterioration using a deliberate practice mastery learning approach: A feasibility study

Sandra Johnston, Lori Delaney, Pauline Gillan, Karen Theobald, Joanne Ramsbotham, Naomi Tutticci

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Abstract

BackgroundPatient assessment underpins recognition of deterioration. Simulation is frequently used to educate about deterioration, but the optimal simulation method is unclear. This study explored the feasibility of using a deliberate practice mastery learning approach (DPML) in a future larger randomized controlled trial (RCT) patient deterioration scenario.SampleSeventy-four nursing students.MethodFeasibility data was collected according to Tickle-Degnen's method of assessing study processes (recruitment and retention), resources (technology), collection and management of data, and science (acceptability and results of the method of simulation).ResultsResources to support an RCT included simulators with data collection capability, student satisfaction, and results of a significantly higher number of intervention groups who completed key behaviors. Barriers include recruitment and retention and the DPML method being unfamiliar.ConclusionImproved recruitment strategies, educating and upskilling a large teaching team to deliver DPML consistently are required for a future RCT.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e225-e228
Number of pages4
JournalTeaching and Learning in Nursing
Volume19
Issue number1
Early online dateNov 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2024

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